Diy baking ideas

Food blogger Adrianna Adarme prepares homemade s’mores pop tarts. See more photos of the pop tarts recipe on the Unused Tastes blog.

  1. 2 1/2 cups all-purpose flour
  2. 1/4 cup unsweetened cocoa powder
  3. To assemble: preheat the oven to degrees F. Line a baking sheet with parchment paper. Put one half of the pop tart squares, about an inch apart. Transfer a teaspoon of chocolate filling to the middle of the rectangles. Then, a few scoops of marshmallow fluff. I did two scoops of marshmallow creme and one chocolate scoop.

    Sprinkle each mound of chocolate and marshmallow creme with a little handful of crushed graham crackers. Brush the edges with egg wash (this will hold the two layers together.) Put the second rectangles of dough atop every of the ones with the filling, gently crimping the edges together, using the tines of a fork. (I didn’t use a fork and a bit of marshmallow and chocolate oozed out the sides. Not the worst thing in the world but I ponder crimping the sides shut is the way to go!)

  4. Combine flour, powdered sugar, and salt in a large bowl.

    Using a box grater, shred butter atop the flour mixture and stir, using your hands, until the mixture resembles a rough meal, with pea size pieces of butter. To a little bowl, stir 2 large egg yolks with 1/4 cup water. Create a well in the middle of the flour mixture and pour in the egg mixture. Stir until it just begins to clump together. If you pinch some of the crumbly dough and it holds together, it’s ready. If the dough doesn’t hold together, add a little more water and stir again.

  5. 3/4 teaspoon salt
  6. 3 to 4 tablespoons heavy cream
  7. Transfer the assembled pop tarts to the freezer for 10 minutes.

    After they do their time in the freezer, brush the tops with the remaining egg wash and using a fork, prick four-five holes in the tops. Put in the pre-heated oven and bake for 17 to 20 minutes, or until lightly golden brown. Transfer to a baking rack to cool for 10 minutes.

  8. 1/2 cup marshmallow creme or marshmallow fluff
  9. 1/4 cup, plus 2 tablespoons, ice water
  10. 2 large egg yolks
  11. While you’re dough is in the refrigerator chilling, turn your attention to the filling.

    Start by creating a makeshift double-boiler. Fill a saucepan one quarter of the way with water and put it on the stove over moderately high heat. In a extremely dry (chocolate hates water!) stainless steel pan, that easily fits in the saucepan, combine the unsweetened cocoa powder, heavy cream, chocolate chips, sugar, butter and pinch of salt. Put the bowl atop the saucepan and gently stir with a rubber spatula until the mixture is smooth. Remove and set aside. The chocolate mixture will thicken as it cools, which is good!

  12. 2 sticks (1 cup) of butter
  13. For the Icing (optional):
  14. Pinch of salt
  15. 2 tablespoons white granulated sugar
  16. 1 tablespoons butter, cubed
  17. For the Egg wash: 1 large egg, beaten
  18. 3 tablespoons powdered sugar
  19. 3 tablespoons cocoa powder, sifted
  20. For the Filling:
  21. 1/2 cup powdered sugar, sifted
  22. Remove both dough disks from the refrigerator.

    Let sit at room temperature for about 10 minutes in order to soften just enough to make rolling out a bit easier. Roll out dough with a rolling pin on a lightly floured surface in the shape of a rectangle with a 1/8″ thickness. Using your cutter, cut the dough into a 10″ x 13″ rectangle. Repeat with the second disk of dough. This is when a ruler really comes in handy. Take your two 10″ x 13″ rectangles and, using your cutter, or a knife, cut each piece into thirds so it turns out that you own about 6 to 8 3 1/2″ x 4″ rectangles.

    And don’t be afraid to re-roll the scraps to get additional pop tarts. If they turn out a bit crooked, don’t worry—no one will care! Note: if you’re dough is extremely soft correct now, lay them on a parchment-lined baking sheet, being certain they don’t overlap, and stick them in the freezer fro 5 minutes. This will make it easier to assemble them

  23. 2 graham crackers, crushed, plus more for topping
  24. Pinch of salt
  25. Remove dough from bowl and put in a mound on a clean surface. Knead the dough until it holds together (I kneaded it about 8 to 10 times) and form it into two discs.

    Wrap each disc in plastic wrap and refrigerate at least 1 hour, and up to 2 days.

  26. 3 ounces dark chocolate chips
  27. For the Pop Tart crust:
  28. 1/3 cup heavy cream
  29. While the pop tarts are baking up, stir together the glaze. In a little bowl, stir together the powdered sugar, cocoa powder, heavy cream and pinch of salt until extremely smooth. If needed, add a splash more of cream. Top the warm pop tarts with the glaze and sprinkle crushed graham crackers.
  • Combine flour, powdered sugar, and salt in a large bowl.

    Using a box grater, shred butter atop the flour mixture and stir, using your hands, until the mixture resembles a rough meal, with pea size pieces of butter. To a little bowl, stir 2 large egg yolks with 1/4 cup water. Create a well in the middle of the flour mixture and pour in the egg mixture. Stir until it just begins to clump together. If you pinch some of the crumbly dough and it holds together, it’s ready. If the dough doesn’t hold together, add a little more water and stir again.

  • While you’re dough is in the refrigerator chilling, turn your attention to the filling.

    Start by creating a makeshift double-boiler. Fill a saucepan one quarter of the way with water and put it on the stove over moderately high heat. In a extremely dry (chocolate hates water!) stainless steel pan, that easily fits in the saucepan, combine the unsweetened cocoa powder, heavy cream, chocolate chips, sugar, butter and pinch of salt. Put the bowl atop the saucepan and gently stir with a rubber spatula until the mixture is smooth. Remove and set aside. The chocolate mixture will thicken as it cools, which is good!

  • Transfer the assembled pop tarts to the freezer for 10 minutes.

    After they do their time in the freezer, brush the tops with the remaining egg wash and using a fork, prick four-five holes in the tops. Put in the pre-heated oven and bake for 17 to 20 minutes, or until lightly golden brown. Transfer to a baking rack to cool for 10 minutes.

  • To assemble: preheat the oven to degrees F. Line a baking sheet with parchment paper. Put one half of the pop tart squares, about an inch apart. Transfer a teaspoon of chocolate filling to the middle of the rectangles. Then, a few scoops of marshmallow fluff. I did two scoops of marshmallow creme and one chocolate scoop. Sprinkle each mound of chocolate and marshmallow creme with a little handful of crushed graham crackers.

    Brush the edges with egg wash (this will hold the two layers together.) Put the second rectangles of dough atop every of the ones with the filling, gently crimping the edges together, using the tines of a fork. (I didn’t use a fork and a bit of marshmallow and chocolate oozed out the sides. Not the worst thing in the world but I ponder crimping the sides shut is the way to go!)

  • Remove dough from bowl and put in a mound on a clean surface.

    Knead the dough until it holds together (I kneaded it about 8 to 10 times) and form it into two discs. Wrap each disc in plastic wrap and refrigerate at least 1 hour, and up to 2 days.

  • Remove both dough disks from the refrigerator. Let sit at room temperature for about 10 minutes in order to soften just enough to make rolling out a bit easier. Roll out dough with a rolling pin on a lightly floured surface in the shape of a rectangle with a 1/8″ thickness.

    Using your cutter, cut the dough into a 10″ x 13″ rectangle. Repeat with the second disk of dough. This is when a ruler really comes in handy. Take your two 10″ x 13″ rectangles and, using your cutter, or a knife, cut each piece into thirds so it turns out that you own about 6 to 8 3 1/2″ x 4″ rectangles. And don’t be afraid to re-roll the scraps to get additional pop tarts.

    Diy baking ideas

    If they turn out a bit crooked, don’t worry—no one will care! Note: if you’re dough is extremely soft correct now, lay them on a parchment-lined baking sheet, being certain they don’t overlap, and stick them in the freezer fro 5 minutes. This will make it easier to assemble them

  • While the pop tarts are baking up, stir together the glaze. In a little bowl, stir together the powdered sugar, cocoa powder, heavy cream and pinch of salt until extremely smooth. If needed, add a splash more of cream. Top the warm pop tarts with the glaze and sprinkle crushed graham crackers.

Yield: servings


Adrianna Adarme is a food blogger and author living in Los Angeles, California.

She writes the blog A Cozy Kitchen, where she shares comforting, everyday recipes from her kitchen. She recently authored her first cookbook, PANCAKES: 72 Sweet and Savory Recipes for the Perfect Stack. Shes a lover of breakfast, pie (and sometimes even pie for breakfast), corgis and cute things. You can discover her on , Instagram, or .

If there’s no cake, is it really a birthday party? Our answer is a firm «no.» While, of course, there’s no incorrect way to celebrate your loved ones, a frosted confection is always a favorite way to do so.

Put your usual cake recipe aside and let these new, simple birthday cake ideas lead the way. From classic sheet cakes to elaborately decorated and towering confections, there are so numerous delightful directions to take when designing your dessert. Even better: You don’t own to be an advanced baker to tug off these best birthday cake ideas.

Another thing we love about these recipes? They’re incredibly versatile. If the guest of honor errs on the traditional side of dessert preferences, bookmark the chocolate and vanilla confections ahead. Do they favor ice cream too? We’ve also included the easiest ice cream cake recipe that’s also totally decadent. This is your chance to forego a store-bought dessert in favor of one of the following homemade cake recipes.

Why? We ponder you’ll discover that the birthday boy or girl will really appreciate the thoughtful gesture of a birthday cake being made with love—just for them.

If youve just scraped seeds out of your pumpkin (save those for roasting!), then youre ready to roast a pumpkin which is, no joke, the easiest squash to roast.

Just halve, scoop out the seeds, and bake!

Let me show you how with this simple, step-by-step tutorial that includes how to make pumpkin purée!

If you need inspiration for how to use your baked pumpkin or purée, youre in luck!

Try my Pumpkin Pie Bars, Pumpkin Pie Green Smoothie, Simple Pumpkin Soup, Vegan Gluten Free Pumpkin Pie, Pumpkin Cinnamon Rolls, Pumpkin Sugar Cookies, Pumpkin Pie Parfaits, Pumpkin Pie Ice Cream, and Minute Pumpkin Butter!

If you attempt this recipe, let us know!

Leave a comment, rate it, and dont forget to tag a photo #minimalistbaker on Instagram. Cheers, friends!

Yield: servings


Adrianna Adarme is a food blogger and author living in Los Angeles, California. She writes the blog A Cozy Kitchen, where she shares comforting, everyday recipes from her kitchen. She recently authored her first cookbook, PANCAKES: 72 Sweet and Savory Recipes for the Perfect Stack. Shes a lover of breakfast, pie (and sometimes even pie for breakfast), corgis and cute things. You can discover her on , Instagram, or .

If there’s no cake, is it really a birthday party? Our answer is a firm «no.» While, of course, there’s no incorrect way to celebrate your loved ones, a frosted confection is always a favorite way to do so.

Put your usual cake recipe aside and let these new, simple birthday cake ideas lead the way. From classic sheet cakes to elaborately decorated and towering confections, there are so numerous delightful directions to take when designing your dessert. Even better: You don’t own to be an advanced baker to tug off these best birthday cake ideas.

Another thing we love about these recipes? They’re incredibly versatile. If the guest of honor errs on the traditional side of dessert preferences, bookmark the chocolate and vanilla confections ahead. Do they favor ice cream too? We’ve also included the easiest ice cream cake recipe that’s also totally decadent. This is your chance to forego a store-bought dessert in favor of one of the following homemade cake recipes.

Diy baking ideas

Why? We ponder you’ll discover that the birthday boy or girl will really appreciate the thoughtful gesture of a birthday cake being made with love—just for them.

If youve just scraped seeds out of your pumpkin (save those for roasting!), then youre ready to roast a pumpkin which is, no joke, the easiest squash to roast.

Just halve, scoop out the seeds, and bake!

Let me show you how with this simple, step-by-step tutorial that includes how to make pumpkin purée!

If you need inspiration for how to use your baked pumpkin or purée, youre in luck!

Try my Pumpkin Pie Bars, Pumpkin Pie Green Smoothie, Simple Pumpkin Soup, Vegan Gluten Free Pumpkin Pie, Pumpkin Cinnamon Rolls, Pumpkin Sugar Cookies, Pumpkin Pie Parfaits, Pumpkin Pie Ice Cream, and Minute Pumpkin Butter!

If you attempt this recipe, let us know!

Leave a comment, rate it, and dont forget to tag a photo #minimalistbaker on Instagram. Cheers, friends!


Tips for Creating Something Beyond the Basic White Loaf

If you get into making your own bread (and why not? Its inexpensive, tasty, and healthy), youll eventually desire to start experimenting. Here are some tips Ive learned over the final year or so.

Bread-making Tips Ive Learned

  1. Different flours work differently. If you attempt making a rye bread or a whole wheat bread, youll discover the flour has diverse properties. Just stick with adding it slowly to the bowl until its just barely not sticking to your hands, and youll be fine.

    Whole wheat flour, for instance, generally requires about half a cup less flour than white flour to reach the correct point.

  2. For a yummy Italian bread, replace the salt with garlic salt and before you start stirring, add in some Italian seasonings, love oregano and rosemary or an Italian seasoning mix.
  3. Eventually, youll start really experimenting. Making pizza dough from scratch is similarly simple, as are cinnamon rolls. Ive reached the point where I feel confident making most bread recipes in the oven (except for sourdough loaves, which always seem to turn out wrong).
  4. You can easily double this recipe and make two loaves at once.

    The time investment is virtually the same and you get twice the bread.

  5. Whats the take home? Baking homemade bread is a extremely worthwhile thing to attempt. Its inexpensive, healthy, and teaches you a lot about how to cook at home. Best of every (for me, anyway), it makes amazingly excellent toast I love to start off my day with a slice of toast made from homemade bread and a cup of tea.


How to Roast Pumpkin

An easy-to-follow recipe for how to roast pumpkin and make homemade pumpkin purée! Perfect for pies, soups, pastas, and more! Servings:4(1-cup servings)Cuisine: Gluten-Free, Vegan

How to Roast Pumpkin

An easy-to-follow recipe for how to roast pumpkin and make homemade pumpkin purée!

Perfect for pies, soups, pastas, and more! Servings:4(1-cup servings)Cuisine: Gluten-Free, Vegan

Ingredients

  1. 1 pumpkin
  2. Preheat oven to degrees F ( C) and line a baking sheet with parchment paper.
  3. If turning into purée, simply scoop pumpkin into a high-speed blender or food processor and mix until creamy and smooth. if it has trouble blending, add a little water. But it shouldn’t need it!
  4. Bake for minutes or until a fork easily pierces the skin. Then remove pan from the oven, let the pumpkin cool for 10 minutes, then scoop out and use for whatever dish you’d prefer!

    See text links above.

  5. 1Tbspcoconut or avocado oil (if avoiding oil, sub water)
  6. Brush the pumpkin flesh with oil and put flesh below on the baking sheet. Pierce skin a few times with a fork or knife to let steam escape.
  7. Using a sharp knife, cut pumpkin in half lengthwise (removing the top and bottom is optional). Then use a sharp spoon or ice cream scoop to scrape out every of the seeds and strings.
  8. 1pinchsea salt
  9. Baked pumpkin and pumpkin purée will hold covered in the refrigerator up to 1 week, or in the freezer for 1 month.

Instructions

  • Preheat oven to degrees F ( C) and line a baking sheet with parchment paper.
  • If turning into purée, simply scoop pumpkin into a high-speed blender or food processor and mix until creamy and smooth.

    if it has trouble blending, add a little water. But it shouldn’t need it!

  • Sodium: 40mg
  • Fat: g
  • Brush the pumpkin flesh with oil and put flesh below on the baking sheet. Pierce skin a few times with a fork or knife to let steam escape.
  • Sugar: 2g
  • Carbohydrates: g
  • Calories: 68
  • Bake for minutes or until a fork easily pierces the skin. Then remove pan from the oven, let the pumpkin cool for 10 minutes, then scoop out and use for whatever dish you’d prefer! See text links above.
  • Using a sharp knife, cut pumpkin in half lengthwise (removing the top and bottom is optional).

    Then use a sharp spoon or ice cream scoop to scrape out every of the seeds and strings.

  • Fiber: g
  • Baked pumpkin and pumpkin purée will hold covered in the refrigerator up to 1 week, or in the freezer for 1 month.
  • Saturated fat: g
  • Protein: g

Notes

*Nutrition information is a rough estimate for 1 cup (one of of 4 servings) of baked pumpkin or pumpkin purée.

Nutrition Per Serving (1 of 4 one-cup servings)

  1. Calories: 68
  2. Saturated fat: g
  3. Sugar: 2g
  4. Fiber: g
  5. Fat: g
  6. Carbohydrates: g
  7. Sodium: 40mg
  8. Protein: g

RAINBOW UNICORN TIE DYE SMORES, EVERYONE!

Who. Is. Excited? *THIS GIRL!* I wish you every could own been in the studio while we were shooting these. Poor Jeff, surrounded by three girls squealing over how enjoyment, colorful and AMAZING these are. We knew we had to go large or go home for the upcoming National Smores Day (August 10th!) so we went large. And we went home. And now, we shall every vow to eat more colorful smores. Heres how

3 packages unflavored gelatin (1/4 ounce packets)
1 1/4 cup water, divided
2 cups sugar
1 cup corn syrup
2 tablespoons vanilla extract
Powdered sugar
Gel food coloring (electric pink, electric blue, electric purple, turquoise green, yellow)
88 Pan

1.

In the bowl of a stand mixer, put the powdered unflavored gelatin with 3/4 cup freezing water. Let sit.
2. In a little sized pot, combine the sugar, corn syrup and remaining 1/2 cup of water. Heat over medium and bring to a boil. Once boiling, lift heat to high and cook until the mixture reaches degrees.
3. Using a fine mesh sieve, completely cover the bottom of an 8-inch square baking pan with a solid layer of powdered sugar. Own five bowls and five spoons ready before whipping the marshmallow.
4. Turn stand mixer to low and carefully pour the boiling sugar mixture into the gelatin.

Turn the speed up to high and whip for 5 to 7 minutes. Add vanilla and stir till combined. (If making plain white marshmallows, continue to whip for a entire of 15 minutes. In order to make and swirl the diverse colors, you need the marshmallow mixture to be a little softer, so only whip for 5 to 7 minutes.)
5. Once you own whipped the mixture, quickly divide the marshmallow into the 5 bowls and color each one with the diverse gel food colorings. Work quickly as the mixture will set fast.
6.

You are going to pour the marshmallow into the pan in 2 layers. For the first layer, in a clockwise direction, put half of the purple in one corner, then half of the pink next to it, followed by half of the yellow, half of the green and ending with half of the blue which should also join back to the purple.
7. Using a stick of any helpful (a chopstick works perfectly!), start to swirl the colors into each other, careful not to completely stir the colors together. This is the enjoyment part! Every batch will be different.
8. Repeat the process on top of your first layer but start the purple in a diverse spot than before.

This just helps to ensure that every marshmallow will own a little bit of every color. Gently swirl the colors only in the new top layer.
9. With the fine mesh sieve, cover generously with powdered sugar and flatten the surface with your hands. Let sit uncovered overnight to set.
Run a knife along the edges. Remove the marshmallows from the pan and cut into squares.

Photos by Jeff Mindell | Recipe by Theresa Rountree | Creative Direction + Styling by Kelly Mindell

In case youre wondering, the marshmallows taste a lot love Peeps!

Sugary, colorful marshmallow goodness.

To study how to make bright natural food dyes, click here! And for more sweets + treats, click here.

psst We just wrapped a REALLY enjoyment (and also colorful!) project with Natasha of Violet Tinder and she did her own take on colorful smores!! I just had to share them so we could every own one large technicolor marshmallow PAR-TAY!

Over the final year, Ive learned to make a lot more meals and staple foods at home. I own focused on this specific area of self-improvement for a few reasons.

Not only does homemade food taste better, but it reduces my familys intake of preservatives, its more nutritious, and its often substantially cheaper than what you discover in the store. It does take time to make most meals from scratch, but most people get faster with experience. Once you get used to cooking from scrach, most food preparation doesnt take much more time than going to the store, buying it, taking it home, popping it out of the package, and following the directions.

Breadmaking is a prime example of this phenomenon. Homemade bread is substantially tastier than store-purchased bread, it isnt laden with preservatives, it is extremely inexpensive to make, and it doesnt take every that much time, either.

For these reasons, I wanted to share some of my favorite recipes for homemade breads your family will love.

Notes

*Nutrition information is a rough estimate for 1 cup (one of of 4 servings) of baked pumpkin or pumpkin purée.

Nutrition Per Serving (1 of 4 one-cup servings)

  1. Calories: 68
  2. Saturated fat: g
  3. Sugar: 2g
  4. Fiber: g
  5. Fat: g
  6. Carbohydrates: g
  7. Sodium: 40mg
  8. Protein: g

RAINBOW UNICORN TIE DYE SMORES, EVERYONE!

Who. Is. Excited? *THIS GIRL!* I wish you every could own been in the studio while we were shooting these. Poor Jeff, surrounded by three girls squealing over how enjoyment, colorful and AMAZING these are. We knew we had to go large or go home for the upcoming National Smores Day (August 10th!) so we went large. And we went home. And now, we shall every vow to eat more colorful smores. Heres how

3 packages unflavored gelatin (1/4 ounce packets)
1 1/4 cup water, divided
2 cups sugar
1 cup corn syrup
2 tablespoons vanilla extract
Powdered sugar
Gel food coloring (electric pink, electric blue, electric purple, turquoise green, yellow)
88 Pan

1.

In the bowl of a stand mixer, put the powdered unflavored gelatin with 3/4 cup freezing water. Let sit.
2. In a little sized pot, combine the sugar, corn syrup and remaining 1/2 cup of water. Heat over medium and bring to a boil. Once boiling, lift heat to high and cook until the mixture reaches degrees.
3. Using a fine mesh sieve, completely cover the bottom of an 8-inch square baking pan with a solid layer of powdered sugar. Own five bowls and five spoons ready before whipping the marshmallow.
4.

Turn stand mixer to low and carefully pour the boiling sugar mixture into the gelatin. Turn the speed up to high and whip for 5 to 7 minutes. Add vanilla and stir till combined. (If making plain white marshmallows, continue to whip for a entire of 15 minutes. In order to make and swirl the diverse colors, you need the marshmallow mixture to be a little softer, so only whip for 5 to 7 minutes.)
5. Once you own whipped the mixture, quickly divide the marshmallow into the 5 bowls and color each one with the diverse gel food colorings.

Work quickly as the mixture will set fast.
6. You are going to pour the marshmallow into the pan in 2 layers. For the first layer, in a clockwise direction, put half of the purple in one corner, then half of the pink next to it, followed by half of the yellow, half of the green and ending with half of the blue which should also join back to the purple.
7. Using a stick of any helpful (a chopstick works perfectly!), start to swirl the colors into each other, careful not to completely stir the colors together. This is the enjoyment part! Every batch will be different.
8.

Repeat the process on top of your first layer but start the purple in a diverse spot than before. This just helps to ensure that every marshmallow will own a little bit of every color. Gently swirl the colors only in the new top layer.
9.

Diy baking ideas

With the fine mesh sieve, cover generously with powdered sugar and flatten the surface with your hands. Let sit uncovered overnight to set.
Run a knife along the edges. Remove the marshmallows from the pan and cut into squares.

Photos by Jeff Mindell | Recipe by Theresa Rountree | Creative Direction + Styling by Kelly Mindell

In case youre wondering, the marshmallows taste a lot love Peeps! Sugary, colorful marshmallow goodness.

To study how to make bright natural food dyes, click here! And for more sweets + treats, click here.

psst We just wrapped a REALLY enjoyment (and also colorful!) project with Natasha of Violet Tinder and she did her own take on colorful smores!!

I just had to share them so we could every own one large technicolor marshmallow PAR-TAY!

Over the final year, Ive learned to make a lot more meals and staple foods at home. I own focused on this specific area of self-improvement for a few reasons. Not only does homemade food taste better, but it reduces my familys intake of preservatives, its more nutritious, and its often substantially cheaper than what you discover in the store. It does take time to make most meals from scratch, but most people get faster with experience. Once you get used to cooking from scrach, most food preparation doesnt take much more time than going to the store, buying it, taking it home, popping it out of the package, and following the directions.

Breadmaking is a prime example of this phenomenon. Homemade bread is substantially tastier than store-purchased bread, it isnt laden with preservatives, it is extremely inexpensive to make, and it doesnt take every that much time, either.

For these reasons, I wanted to share some of my favorite recipes for homemade breads your family will love.


The Bottom Line

So, there you own it.

Baking your own bread isnt almost as hard as people make it out to be, and I hope I proved that with the step-by-step instructions I shared above. I hope youll attempt this recipe for your own family before you purchase another loaf of bread from the store. Once you start making your own bread, youll be hooked.

Related Articles: 


How to Make Your Own Tasty Homemade Bread, Easily and Cheaply

While making your own bread is simple, over time Ive found that numerous people are simply intimidated by the seemingly complicated and work-intensive process of making bread. If youve never made your own before, it may seem hard and loaded with steps and significant work.

However, this couldnt be further from the truth.

The reality is, bread is fairly simple to make at home, and you only need a few staple ingredients to make a simple loaf. Heres exactly how to make a yummy loaf at home from scratch.

What you see in the picture above is every ingredient and piece of equipment that you need to make a loaf of bread (except the oven). Nothing here is complicated at all; these are extremely basic ingredients and tools you can get extremely inexpensively at your local grocery store. In fact, the ingredients on that table (except for the yeast) are enough to make several loaves of bread.

Heres the equipment you need

  1. One large mixing bowl A second one is useful, but optional you can get by with one if youre willing to wash it in the middle of the process.
  2. One measuring cup A 1/4 or 1/2 cup measuring cup will do the job.
  3. One bread pan Obviously, to bake the bread in.
  4. One measuring spoon A one-teaspoon measurer will be just perfect.
  5. One spoon You need a spoon to stir the dough.
  6. One hand towel This is just to cover the bread dough as it rises so it doesnt get drafts or dust or anything on it.

Thats every you need, and its every stuff thats beautiful common in most kitchens.

Now, for the food ingredients

  1. 1/4 cup milk
  2. 1 teaspoons salt
  3. 2 1/2 to 3 1/2 cups flour (get unbleached white for your first attempt)
  4. 1 package athletic dry yeast (you can get yeast near the flour at your local grocery store)
  5. 5 teaspoons sugar (or 1 1/2 tablespoons)
  6. 5 teaspoons butter (or 1 1/2 tablespoons)
  7. Corn starch or nonstick cooking spray (just to prevent the bread from sticking to the bowl or pan)

That’s every you need for homemade bread, period.

These items are beautiful basic, so check your grocery store circular and glance for online coupons (we update our coupon finder daily) to see if you can discover these items on sale or discounted bulk. There are some tidy things you can do with added ingredients, which I’ll talk about later, but every you need is the stuff listed above and nothing more.

When I bake bread, I normally stir the dough with my KitchenAid stand mixer. However, making bread is simple enough that this is just a convenience and not a requirement by any means. Basically, instead of doing the kneading and stirring described under, I just flip a switch and this machine does it for me.

OK, lets get started.

First, you should warm up the bowl the best way to do that is to just fill it with boiling water, then dump out the boiling water, leaving the bowl rather warm. Then, stir up the yeast according to the directions on the packet. Generally, it will tell something along the lines of add a cup of warm water to the yeast and stir. What youll finish up with is some tan-colored water with some bubbles in it, as shown above. You should stir this until there are no lumps in the yeast.

Melt the butter in the microwave, then add it, the milk, the sugar, and the salt to the yeast liquid and stir it up until everything looks the same (a extremely light tan liquid).

Then add two cups of flour to the stir dont add the relax yet. Your bowl should glance something love whats shown above, where I own the spoon on board ready to stir.

Start stirring, and then add the flour about 1/4 cup at a time every minute or so. It will stick to the spoon large time at first dont worry about it. Hold stirring and adding flour until the dough is still slightly sticky, but it doesnt stick to your hands in any significant way.

Also, it should largely clean the sides of the bowl, leaving just a thin layer of floury stuff. Itll glance something love the above.

Now comes the enjoyment part: kneading. Take a bit of flour between your hands and then rub them together over the top of an area on the table where youre going to knead the dough. Do this a few times until theres an area on the table lightly covered in flour. Then grab the dough ball out of the bowl, slap it below on the table, and start beating on it.

Do this for ten minutes. Just take the dough, punch it flat, then fold it back up into a ball again, and repeat several times. I also love to take it in my hands and squeeze and twist it.

When the ten minutes are up, shape it into a ball (like shown above), then either clean up the bowl you were using before or get out another bowl. Either jacket the inside lightly with corn starch or nonstick cooking spray, depending on your preference, then put the ball of dough inside the bowl.

Put a cloth over the bowl and sit it somewhere fairly warm for an hour.

If you own a warming area on your stove top, thats a grand put to put it set the warming area on as low as it will go, as Im doing in the picture above. This is a excellent time to clean everything else and put the stuff away, but leave the flour out and the floured area on your table untouched.

Heres what the dough looks love before rising

and then an hour later after rising, still in the bowl

It should be roughly double the size that it was before, but dont sweat it too much if its larger or smaller than that, as endless as it rose at least some quantity.

Punch the dough below (three or four excellent whacks will cause it to shrink back below to normal), then lay the dough out on the floured area and spread it out in a rectangle shape, with one side being roughly the length of the bread pan and the other side being about a bread pan and a half long.

You may need to put a bit more flour on it and on the table to prevent sticking. Then, roll it up! The roll should be roughly the same size as the bread pan, as shown below.

Tuck the ends of the roll underneath, with the under side being where the seam is. Then spray the bread pan below with nonstick cooking spray (or jacket it with cornmeal) and put the loaf inside of the pan.

Cover that loaf up with the towel, put it back where it was before, and wait another hour.

This is a excellent time to clean everything up, then go do something else enjoyment. The loaf should lift some more:

Put that loaf in the oven at degrees Fahrenheit ( degrees Celsius) for thirty minutes. When its done, tug it out and immediately remove it from the pan to cool. Itll glance something love this, hopefully.

Let it cool below completely before slicing.

This bread will make mind-blowing toast. Seriously, pop a slice in the toaster, get it golden brown, and spread a bit of butter or margarine on it.

Truly, truly sublime.


The Problems With Industrial Bread

Most people in the United States view the bread purchased at the supermarket as what bread should be. However, the reality is that the bread you can purchase at the store looks and feels the way it does so it can be made on an industrial scale and final a endless time without going bad.

There are two large explanations for this.

The industrial scale process is designed to maximize profit while still producing an edible loaf of bread you can serve at dinner. This is done by using an excessive quantity of yeast in order to create lots of air bubbles in the bread, hence the light texture of store-purchased bread.

Diy baking ideas

It also allows for the use of lower-quality grains because of this yeast abundance, which means the bread is far from nutrient-rich. In the United States, most recipes are trade secrets, but in the United Kingdom, the standard recipe known as the Chorleywood Bread Process is widely known. The goal of this process is to make a loaf of bread as cheaply as possible, foregoing flavor, nutrition, and texture along the way.

The other bothersome part of industrial breadmaking is the appearance of a healthy dose of preservatives. These preservatives are there for the sole reason of extending the shelf life of the bread, again reducing costs for the manufacturer.

Diy baking ideas

Every time you eat a piece of store-purchased bread, youre getting a healthy dose of preservatives with each bite.

Take a glance at the ingredient list from a loaf of Home Pride butter top honey wheat bread, which is a fairly standard store-purchased loaf in my area. I put some of the ingredients in bold font for the full effect.

Enriched wheat flour (flour, barley malt, ferrous sulfate (iron), B vitamins (niacin, thaimine mononitrate (B1), riboflavin (B2), folic acid)), water, sweetener (high fructose corn syrup or sugar), yeast, wheat bran, whole wheat flour, wheat gluten, molasses.

Contains 2% or less of: soybean oil, salt, sweet dairy whey, butter (cream, salt, enzymes), maltodextrin, honey, corn syrup, calcium sulfate, soy flur, dough conditioners (may contain: dicalcium phosphate, calcium dioxide, sodium stearoyl lactylate, ethoxylated mono and diglycerides, mono and diglycerides, and/or datem), yeast nutrients (may contain: ammonium sulfate, ammonium chloride, calcium carbonate, monocalcium phosphate, and/or ammonium phosphate), cornstarch, wheat starch, vinegar, natural flavor, beta carotene (color), enzymes, calcium propionate (to retain freshness), soy lecithin.

This doesnt sound love a wholesome food we should be serving our families, does it?

This sounds love a chemical-laden substance we wouldnt serve our worst enemies. Yet, this is exactly what store-bought bread is made from.


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