Diy fish bowl ideas

The betta was first discovered in Southeast Asia.

Diy fish bowl ideas

Making its home in rice paddies, drainage ditches and the warm flood plains of the region, the betta became accustomed to frequent storm flooding and devastating droughts. The cyclic, drastic changes in its environment helped the fish to adapt — becoming a true labyrinth fish. A labyrinth fish has the unique ability to breathe oxygen directly from the air and also take in oxygen from its gills. As a result, bettas and other labyrinth fish can survive for short periods of time out of water and if needed, can inhale the air around them (provided they stay moist.) This also explains why a betta can sustain itself in stagnant, oxygen-deficient water.

Diy fish bowl ideas

Although bettas can tolerate little spaces and poor water quality, they do best in little aquariums (at least two gallons) with regular water changes. The preferred water temperature for a betta is degrees F.


How to make fish tank decorations at home:

Before you put anything in your aquarium, make certain it’s not going to affect the water. Stay away from natural things you discover exterior or anything that has paint, it can chip or be worn away by the water.

If youre worried (of course you are!) you can test your decor by placing it in warm water for a few days to see how it reactsDoes the paint affect the water?

does it flake or rust,? do the water parameters change?

Tip:  A lot of aquarists use Krylon Fusion Paint in their aquariums to seal or paint homemade decorations. Kyrlon Fusion comes in a few colours as well as clear. So go ahead & use that ancient G.I Cobra Comander Figurine, just seal it first.

Here is a grand article by  that discusses how to decorate a fish tank with household items and a few aquarium safe materials you can use when making your DIY aquarium decorations.

Youll also need to make certain you clean everything well so you don’t introduce any contaminants into your tank.

Now, let’s take a glance at some cool homemade DIY fish tank decoration ideas for your freshwater aquarium.

Contents

What’s the first thing that comes to mind when you hear ‘Fishbowl’?

Diy fish bowl ideas

I bet you’re not thinking about people sitting in circles and animatedly discussing a topic. It’s totally fine if you were thinking about an aquarium. However, we desire to talk about Fishbowl as an excellent, future-oriented user research method.

This is the first article in a series of posts about Fishbowl as a user research method. In this post you’ll get a first peek into the method. The second post will take you deeper into understanding how you can use the method and what you should be aware of. Follow-up posts will highlight the major Fishbowl variants so that you can pick the one that best suits your workshop needs.

Fishbowl is not a traditional user research tool from our methodological toolbox at SAP. But in the age of IoT and Industry , doing user research with finish users is becoming more and more of a challenge. Looking beyond the traditional way of doing things has become a must.


The Fishbowl Method in a Nutshell

The Fishbowl may be a new method in the domain of user research, but it has been around for fairly a while as a learning method used in schools, universities, supervision, or in business.

The basic setup for a Fishbowl, two nested circles of chairs, is always the same:

  1. Inner circle
    chairs are arranged in an inner circle.

    Participants in this circle are the ones discussing a topic.

  2. Outer circle
    Chairs are arranged in an outer circle. Participants in the outer circle hear to the discussion and own the chance to switch to the inner circle to contribute as well.

In the research setting we use at SAP, we own added a third circle of observers to the Fishbowl:

  1. Moderator and note taker circle
    This circle consists of a moderator and (ideally) several note takers. The following picture depicts how we own run Fishbowls at SAP.

The method offers a variety of possibilities to stir and match the inner and the outer circles, so that you can adjust it to your research needs.

The most favorite variants are the Open Variant, the Closed Variant, and the Inside-Outside Variant.


Challenges for Researching Future Scenarios

These are the questions that we’ve repeatedly been asking ourselves:

  1. Who are the future users?
    First and foremost, the finish users or their roles don’t yet exist for some future scenarios. How can we conduct research for future scenarios with a person if these scenarios are likely to significantly change the way he or she works today?

    Existing research methods mainly revolve around the „as-is“ way of doing things.

  2. How can we get access to the future finish users?
    It is hard to approach companies and enquire for finish user contact if they are not certain who of their staff will be working in the future scenarios we are generating for them.
  3. How can we present the future scenarios to finish users without making them worry about their jobs?
    Given today’s rapid technological advances, users are afraid of losing their jobs more than ever before.

    Is there a way to get users to assist us shape their future workplace instead of just making them fear for their jobs?


Why a Fishbowl Is Suitable for Future-Oriented Research

With a Fishbowl you can not only address a larger group of people at once, but also a diverse set of roles. For example, you can own the managers, the current finish users and some related roles in one Fishbowl giving input on a future vision.

You can use a Fishbowl to:

  • Get input on a vision, topic or scenario from diverse users
  • Uncover group-specific and cross-group topics and issues
    1. By providing a safe environment for each group to express their thoughts, expectations and ideas  
    2. By observing and analyzing in-group and cross-group discussions, statements and processes
  • Detect topics for further exploration
    1. To cover a lot of ground in a short time
    2. To unearth issues or topics yet unknown to you or the participants  

    For a deep-dive into the method, an overview of the three variants, and an account of our experiences, own a glance at the follow-up post, Fishbowl – A Deep Dive.

    Stay tuned as we’ll take a closer glance at the diverse variants and provide more details in future contributions.

    Use this link to find all posts about the Fishbowl method.

    Tags: fishbowl, industry , IoT, method, research method, research tool, User Research

    Follow conversation

    Owning a fish is an exercise in mental fortitude. You might ponder your little underwater friend will bring tranquility to your life, that you will experience the joy of pet ownership without the commitment or mess.

    Wrong. To own a fish is to experience a near-constant anxiety crisis.

    You will discover yourself checking approximately times a day to see if your fish is dead, wondering if it might be happier with a castle or perhaps a plastic pineapple, and realizing that its life in that waterlogged box is both extremely depressing and a extremely excellent reminder of your own mortality. You will discover yourself Googling things love, “Fish pacing back and forth in tank” or “Can fish love?” and not feeling at every excellent about the answers you find.

    If you really must get a fish, though, here's some advice: Get a low maintenance tank.

    Relieve yourself of the stress that comes with cleaning and filtering and fiddling with temperature, allowing yourself to move up Maslow's hierarchy of needs when questioning your fish's happiness. I propose Back to the Roots, an Oakland startup that makes a compact, self-cleaning aquaponics tank. It provides a nice put to home your fish, with a miniature garden that filters the water and repurposes fish waste as fertilizer.

    For the uninitiated, aquaponics refers to systems in which fish and plants enjoy a symbiotic relationship.

    To oversimplify just a tad: As fish swim around, they eat and poop and their waste gets sucked up by the water pump. The pump delivers water to the garden in the lid, providing nutrients to the plants. The plants, in turn, filter the water, which returns to the tank. Voila! A self-cleaning, self-sustaining ecosystem that requires little maintenance.

    The practice supposedly goes as far back as the Aztecs, though modern incarnations can be found in places love Bangladesh, Malaysia, and Barbados, where people use aquaponics to boost food production. For us amateurs, though, tabletop systems provide a nice put to put your fish, an easy-to-grow garden, and a tank that demands extremely little of you.

    Aquaponics for Dummies

    The Back to the Roots $ starter kit includes with a 3 gallon tank, a water pump, gravel for the floor of the tank, grow stones for the planter tray, and packets of wheatgrass and radish seeds.

    The company also throws in fish food and a bottle of beneficial bacteria to kick-start your little ecosystem. Just add water—and fish.

    Why a Fishbowl Is Suitable for Future-Oriented Research

    With a Fishbowl you can not only address a larger group of people at once, but also a diverse set of roles. For example, you can own the managers, the current finish users and some related roles in one Fishbowl giving input on a future vision.

    You can use a Fishbowl to:

  • Get input on a vision, topic or scenario from diverse users
  • Uncover group-specific and cross-group topics and issues
    1. By providing a safe environment for each group to express their thoughts, expectations and ideas  
    2. By observing and analyzing in-group and cross-group discussions, statements and processes
  • Detect topics for further exploration
    1. Find a room with a excellent quantity of open space and clear out anything other than chairs.
    2. Introduce the game and assign “observer” or “player” status to each person.

      Give everyone a pen and a handout (but mention that the handout is used only in the observer role). Enquire the participants to sit in the circle relative to their assigned role.

    3. Create a handout (see ‘Attachments’)
    4. Announce the topic of the game and enquire the players to take 15 minutes to own a discussion around it. Use the questions you generated before the meeting to start the conversation and hold it moving. Make certain the players know that their responsibility is simply to converse in the circle.

      Make certain the observers know that their role is to pay shut attention and to record on the handouts every discussion points and evidence that come out of the conversation.

    5. To unearth issues or topics yet unknown to you or the participants  
    6. When 15 minutes are up, enquire the group to switch seats and switch roles. Then start another minute discussion on the same topic or a diverse one.
    7. Before the meeting, ponder of a topic that could be served by a group discussion and record below questions associated with it.
    8. Arrange the chairs in two concentric circles in the room, (see ‘Attachments’). The inner circle seats the players engaged in conversation; the outer circle seats the players acting as observers.
    9. To cover a lot of ground in a short time
    10. After both conversations own completed, enquire for volunteers to share the information they gathered and ask them to describe their experiences on the inner versus outer circle.

    For a deep-dive into the method, an overview of the three variants, and an account of our experiences, own a glance at the follow-up post, Fishbowl – A Deep Dive.

    Stay tuned as we’ll take a closer glance at the diverse variants and provide more details in future contributions.

    Use this link to find all posts about the Fishbowl method.

    Tags: fishbowl, industry , IoT, method, research method, research tool, User Research

    Follow conversation

    Owning a fish is an exercise in mental fortitude. You might ponder your little underwater friend will bring tranquility to your life, that you will experience the joy of pet ownership without the commitment or mess.

    Wrong.

    To own a fish is to experience a near-constant anxiety crisis. You will discover yourself checking approximately times a day to see if your fish is dead, wondering if it might be happier with a castle or perhaps a plastic pineapple, and realizing that its life in that waterlogged box is both extremely depressing and a extremely excellent reminder of your own mortality. You will discover yourself Googling things love, “Fish pacing back and forth in tank” or “Can fish love?” and not feeling at every excellent about the answers you find.

    If you really must get a fish, though, here's some advice: Get a low maintenance tank.

    Relieve yourself of the stress that comes with cleaning and filtering and fiddling with temperature, allowing yourself to move up Maslow's hierarchy of needs when questioning your fish's happiness. I propose Back to the Roots, an Oakland startup that makes a compact, self-cleaning aquaponics tank. It provides a nice put to home your fish, with a miniature garden that filters the water and repurposes fish waste as fertilizer.

    For the uninitiated, aquaponics refers to systems in which fish and plants enjoy a symbiotic relationship. To oversimplify just a tad: As fish swim around, they eat and poop and their waste gets sucked up by the water pump.

    The pump delivers water to the garden in the lid, providing nutrients to the plants. The plants, in turn, filter the water, which returns to the tank. Voila! A self-cleaning, self-sustaining ecosystem that requires little maintenance.

    The practice supposedly goes as far back as the Aztecs, though modern incarnations can be found in places love Bangladesh, Malaysia, and Barbados, where people use aquaponics to boost food production.

    For us amateurs, though, tabletop systems provide a nice put to put your fish, an easy-to-grow garden, and a tank that demands extremely little of you.

    Aquaponics for Dummies

    The Back to the Roots $ starter kit includes with a 3 gallon tank, a water pump, gravel for the floor of the tank, grow stones for the planter tray, and packets of wheatgrass and radish seeds. The company also throws in fish food and a bottle of beneficial bacteria to kick-start your little ecosystem. Just add water—and fish.

    Preparation

    • Find a room with a excellent quantity of open space and clear out anything other than chairs.
    • Create a handout (see ‘Attachments’)
    • Before the meeting, ponder of a topic that could be served by a group discussion and record below questions associated with it.
    • Arrange the chairs in two concentric circles in the room, (see ‘Attachments’).

      The inner circle seats the players engaged in conversation; the outer circle seats the players acting as observers.

    Flow

    Flow

    • Announce the topic of the game and enquire the players to take 15 minutes to own a discussion around it.

      Diy fish bowl ideas

      Use the questions you generated before the meeting to start the conversation and hold it moving. Make certain the players know that their responsibility is simply to converse in the circle. Make certain the observers know that their role is to pay shut attention and to record on the handouts every discussion points and evidence that come out of the conversation.

    • When 15 minutes are up, enquire the group to switch seats and switch roles.

      Then start another minute discussion on the same topic or a diverse one.

    • Introduce the game and assign “observer” or “player” status to each person. Give everyone a pen and a handout (but mention that the handout is used only in the observer role). Enquire the participants to sit in the circle relative to their assigned role.
    • After both conversations own completed, enquire for volunteers to share the information they gathered and ask them to describe their experiences on the inner versus outer circle.

    Note: Talk to the group about their experience of being silent and paying attention. What was hard about it? What was easy?

    How did it affect their perception of the topic and the other players? Use the Fishbowl exercise as a segue to a heightened give-and-take between stakeholders.

    Big fish in a little pond — or little fish in a little container?

    The Siamese fighting fish, or betta, is a vibrantly-colored fish often seen swimming solo in brandy sniffers and ornamental vases in both the office and home.

    Diy fish bowl ideas

    But do these little, aesthetically-pleasing fish bowls provide a healthy environment for the fish? Is the favorite betta bachelor in need of a companion or is it better off living alone?

    Read on and study more about this graceful, multi-hued fish, and remember: If work or travel keeps you from home, always select aprofessionalpet sitter for your pet-sitting needs. You can discover your local professional pet sitter on PSI’sPet Sitter Locator.

    Note: Talk to the group about their experience of being silent and paying attention.

    What was hard about it? What was easy? How did it affect their perception of the topic and the other players? Use the Fishbowl exercise as a segue to a heightened give-and-take between stakeholders.

    Big fish in a little pond — or little fish in a little container?

    The Siamese fighting fish, or betta, is a vibrantly-colored fish often seen swimming solo in brandy sniffers and ornamental vases in both the office and home. But do these little, aesthetically-pleasing fish bowls provide a healthy environment for the fish? Is the favorite betta bachelor in need of a companion or is it better off living alone?

    Read on and study more about this graceful, multi-hued fish, and remember: If work or travel keeps you from home, always select aprofessionalpet sitter for your pet-sitting needs.

    You can discover your local professional pet sitter on PSI’sPet Sitter Locator.


    What’s in a name?

    The betta got its name from an ancient clan of warriors, called the «Bettah.» The fish were given a combatant name after the fighting fish became favorite in the mids. In fact, the sport became so renowned in Thailand that the previous King of Siam had it regulated and taxed! Spectators of the sport based their bets on the bravery of the fish, rather than the damage inflicted by the victor.


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