Diy hanging lighting ideas

Fix Up an Antique
If you discover an antique fixture you love—like this lantern-esque piece in the home of design duo Heiberg Cummings—just rewire them and they'll be excellent as new. Source on sites love eBay, Etsy, and 1stdibs (or at your local thrift store!).

Consider Can Lighting
In this stunner of an L.A. home by design collective the Archers, a Le Corbusier-inspired table is lit with simple can overhead lights (definitely on dimmers).

See Double
If your table is super-long, consider getting two or more pendant lights to distribute the glow evenly (that way everyone will be capable to see their dinner).

We love this "duet" fixture by Swedish newcomer Hem.

Vary Heights
As evidenced by a playful display in this NYC apartment, some pendant lamp pairs glance best when they're hung at diverse heights.

Forego It Altogether
Sconces, floor lamps, even table lamps can do the occupation of overhead pendant and flushmount fixtures—so don't force one if you're not certain you love the glance at every (proof, via Amelie Colombet's apartment).

Great lighting is generally sooo expensive…but I’m learning that you can make gorgeous DIY lighting for extremely little money.

This DIY hanging light is a grand example of that.

It’s time for another Repurpose, recycle, reuse project and this month I managed to both repurpose and reuse. I reused an ancient worn out lampshade that I just couldnt throw away and I repurposed an indoor/outdoor tablecloth from TJMaxx into an awesome lampshade cover.

I’ve been on a bit of a DIY lighting kick lately. It started with my DIY orb light fixturein the foyer and continued with myvintage camera lamp. And now I’m back with a super cheap hanging pendant light that you can hang literally anywhere.

Seriously, every you need is a wall outlet nearby.

I decided to hang mine out on our huge screened porch. That baby is four hundred square feet of screened-in goodness and only has one little tiny light fixture way below on the end.

What I’m learning from every this DIY lighting I’ve been tackling lately is that wiring a light really isn’t so scary. I mean, yes, you need to be extremely careful because electricity is dangerous. But it is soo doable.

This post contains affiliate links.See myfull disclosure here.


How to Install Dining Room Lighting

When hanging a pendant or a chandelier . . .
Take Care to Hang It at the Correct Height
Too high and a pendant lamp might glance stuck to the ceiling, constricted; too low and you won't be capable to see your guests around it.

Somewhere in between is just correct, so step back and consider it at various lengths before settling on one. "When you’re seated, you don’t desire [the fixture] to be in your face—the same way everyone gets annoyed when flowers are in the way," Groves says.

If you're into geometric lines . . .
Get Creative with the Cord
When hanging a pendant lamp with a extremely simple silhouette, feel free to get creative with the cord: Zig-zag it from wall to wall around a corner, tack it in swags along the ceiling, or loop it over a hook on the wall.

To soften overly bright overheads .

Diy hanging lighting ideas

. .
Add a Dimmer
Designer Sam Allen feels strongly about the worth of a dimmer switch: "If your dining room chandelier is not hooked up to a dimmer, call an electrician correct now. I mean it. Don't even finish reading this—call your electrician first." With the simple pressing of a lever or turning of a knob, dimmers permit you to control the brightness of the bulbs, which is particularly significant if you're dealing with often-harsh overhead lighting. "To me, chandeliers should mimic candlelight," says Groves—and that warm, dim glow is possible if you just install dimmers.

Plus, they're available in both modern and traditional silhouettes that will add considerably more charm to the walls than those plastic switch plates you hate anyway.

To make the room multifunctional .

Diy hanging lighting ideas

. .
Supplement the Lighting Solution You Choose
If you finish up with nice, warm candlelight over the table, you might need to add sconces or downlights to supplement the glow when the room is used for anything other than an intimate dinner. (Dining room tables are extremely excellent for DIY projects, we'd love to note).

If you're a fanatic about light quality . .

Diy hanging lighting ideas

.
Be Selective with the Bulbs You Use
Warm light, cool light, bright light—you can get exactly the brightness level you desire with the correct bulb. For lots of ambiance, attempt vintage-inspired filament bulbs. If it's more a specific shape and style you're after for an exposed-bulb fixture, attempt decorative bulbs.


Materials for DIY hanging pendant light

  • old worn out, ugly lampshade – if yours still has the ugly pleated fabric, simply remove it
  • fabric of your choice
  • white fabric for lining
  • hot glue gun
  • Lamp Cord
  • Pull Chain Socket
  • Lamp Loop

    How To Make A Super Cheap Hanging Light

     Make a gorgeous DIY hanging light for extremely little money.

    Materials

    1. Screw one finish of the threaded nipple into the loop.
    2. Lamp Loop
    3. Wrap the two exposed wires to the socket around the two screws on the side.
    4. Fold the top and bottom edges of the fabric to make a hem.
    5. Hot glue the white fabric to line the inside of the lampshade.
    6. Tighten the screws to secure them.
    7. White fabric for lining
    8. Tie the two strands into a knot.
    9. Lampshade
    10. Thread one finish of the lamp cord through the middle loop and slip it into the hole on top of the lampshade.
    11. Fabric
    12. Tug Chain Socket
    13. Pop your tug chain socket apart.
    14. Cut the fabric a few inches longer than the lampshade.
    15. Screw the base into the free finish of the threaded nipple.
    16. Snap the socket back together.
    17. Pull the lamp cord apart into two strands leaving a half inch of exposed wire at the ends.
    18. Lamp Cord
    19. Secure with boiling glue on the inside of the frame.

    Instructions

    • Pull the lamp cord apart into two strands leaving a half inch of exposed wire at the ends.
    • Screw the base into the free finish of the threaded nipple.
    • Snap the socket back together.
    • Fold the top and bottom edges of the fabric to make a hem.
    • Cut the fabric a few inches longer than the lampshade.
    • Tighten the screws to secure them.
    • Thread one finish of the lamp cord through the middle loop and slip it into the hole on top of the lampshade.
    • Wrap the two exposed wires to the socket around the two screws on the side.
    • Screw one finish of the threaded nipple into the loop.
    • Tie the two strands into a knot.
    • Pop your tug chain socket apart.
    • Hot glue the white fabric to line the inside of the lampshade.
    • Secure with boiling glue on the inside of the frame.

    Recommended Products

    As an Amazon Associate and member of other affiliate programs, I earn from qualifying purchases.

    And as always, be certain to check out my fellow bloggers’ inspiring repurposed, recycled, and reused projects.

    Every month I come away with some grand new ideas!

    Repurposed Thrift Store Chandelier from Life as a Thrifter

    Repurposed Hose Caddy from Bigger than the Three of Us

    Basket Hanging Light from Thrifty and Chic

    DIY Magazine Coasters made from a Pottery Barn Catalogfrom Every Things G&D

    Have you ever wired your own lamp or light fixture?

    Diy hanging lighting ideas

    Now that I know how simple it is, its love a whole new world of DIY possibilities has opened up! Do you own any dark, dreary rooms that could use a cheerful hanging light?

    Or an ugly lampshade hanging around, waiting to be useful again – it may just own a new purpose now!

    Here are some of my other favoriteinexpensive DIY lighting ideas:

    DIY Industrial Light

    Inexpensive Orb Chandelier

    How to Turn a Lantern into a Lamp

    31 Comments

    There’s something really satisfying about creating a useful object with your own two hands, especially if you make it with recycled materials.

    Diy hanging lighting ideas

    If helping the environment while realizing creative ideas and making crafty items appeals to you, here are some excellent DIY ideas for light fixtures love desk lamps or chandeliers that will literally brighten your day.

    DIY room decor projects that also use recycled materials are becoming more and more favorite with people every over the world because they give us a tangible, genuine way to make a little difference in our waste imprint as a species. Granted, not every of these ideas are genuinely recycling-oriented, but they can still save you a heck of a lot of money.

    If you’re excellent with your hands in any way, there’s probably a DIY chandelier project or two here that you could attempt out at home. And if not – check out our other DIY recycling post for more ideas! Only a few of the projects on this list require special or unusual tools.

    There are tons of DIY light fixture projects out there to select from if you’re interested – these are just some of our favorite unique chandeliers.

    DIY lamp projects are a grand way to get started with because they are absolutely beautiful and make a extremely noticeable impact in your home – they’re highly visible and lovely if they are compatible with your home decor. Once you make a beautiful crystal chandelier out of leftover plastic bottles or spoons, using potential waste in other creative ways won’t seem so far-fetched.

    The possibilities are endless!

    Recommended Products

    As an Amazon Associate and member of other affiliate programs, I earn from qualifying purchases.

    And as always, be certain to check out my fellow bloggers’ inspiring repurposed, recycled, and reused projects.

    Every month I come away with some grand new ideas!

    Repurposed Thrift Store Chandelier from Life as a Thrifter

    Repurposed Hose Caddy from Bigger than the Three of Us

    Basket Hanging Light from Thrifty and Chic

    DIY Magazine Coasters made from a Pottery Barn Catalogfrom Every Things G&D

    Have you ever wired your own lamp or light fixture? Now that I know how simple it is, its love a whole new world of DIY possibilities has opened up! Do you own any dark, dreary rooms that could use a cheerful hanging light?

    Or an ugly lampshade hanging around, waiting to be useful again – it may just own a new purpose now!

    Here are some of my other favoriteinexpensive DIY lighting ideas:

    DIY Industrial Light

    Inexpensive Orb Chandelier

    How to Turn a Lantern into a Lamp

    31 Comments

    There’s something really satisfying about creating a useful object with your own two hands, especially if you make it with recycled materials.

    If helping the environment while realizing creative ideas and making crafty items appeals to you, here are some excellent DIY ideas for light fixtures love desk lamps or chandeliers that will literally brighten your day.

    DIY room decor projects that also use recycled materials are becoming more and more favorite with people every over the world because they give us a tangible, genuine way to make a little difference in our waste imprint as a species.

    Granted, not every of these ideas are genuinely recycling-oriented, but they can still save you a heck of a lot of money. If you’re excellent with your hands in any way, there’s probably a DIY chandelier project or two here that you could attempt out at home. And if not – check out our other DIY recycling post for more ideas! Only a few of the projects on this list require special or unusual tools.

    There are tons of DIY light fixture projects out there to select from if you’re interested – these are just some of our favorite unique chandeliers.

    DIY lamp projects are a grand way to get started with because they are absolutely beautiful and make a extremely noticeable impact in your home – they’re highly visible and lovely if they are compatible with your home decor. Once you make a beautiful crystal chandelier out of leftover plastic bottles or spoons, using potential waste in other creative ways won’t seem so far-fetched.

    The possibilities are endless!


    Instructions

    I chose to wire my light before recovering the shade but you can definitely recover the shade first if you would love. As always be extremely careful when working with electricity and of course, do not plug in your light while you are still working on it.

    First screw one finish of your threaded nipple into your loop.

    Diy hanging lighting ideas

    (Threaded nipple is just what you call that little tube with the ridges on the exterior – I own no thought why they chose to call it that.)

    Thread one finish of your lamp cord through the middle of your loop/nipple and slip the whole thing into the hole in the top of your lampshade. Pop your tug chain socket apart – extremely simple to do – and screw the base into the free finish of the threaded nipple.

    Pull several inches of the lamp cord apart into two strands and make certain you own a half inch or so of exposed wire at the ends.

    If not use sturdy scissors to carefully strip away some of the plastic. Then tie the two strands into a knot love you were going to tie your shoes.

    Carefully attach the two exposed wires to the socket by wrapping them around the two screws on the sides and then tightening the screws to secure them. Snap your socket back together. And that is it as far as wiring!

    Now it is time to recover your shade (if needed).

    *Update: When I originally did this project, I made up my own way to recover the lampshade using boiling glue. It was fine but up shut you could definitely tell that it was a DIY occupation. (And not in a excellent way.)

    Since then, Ive learned that it really isnt that hard or expensive to make a lampshade the genuine way using any fabric you desire. Ive got a full tutorial on how to do it correct hereif youre interested. If not, hold reading for the lowdown on how I made my own version.

    To make the lampshade, I used a scrap of white fabric to line the inside, boiling gluing the top and bottom edges to the lampshade frame.

    Then I used a little of my tablecloth fabric to cover the exterior.

    I cut my fabric a few inches taller than the actual shade. I folded over the top and bottom edges of the fabric to make a hem using boiling glue. To hold the edges tidy, I folded the hemmed fabric over the top and bottom of the shade and glued them on the inside.

    The grand thing about this type of light is that you don’t need to worry about where you own overhead lighting wired in; this can be used anywhere. If you are using this inside, you can simply use a hook that screws correct into the ceiling to hold it up.

    I was hanging mine on a metal porch ceiling so I chose to use some command hooks to hold the fixture and also hold the cord where I desire it.

    The light weighs extremely little so I am beautiful certain the command hooks will hold it. So far, so good!



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