Diy large picture frame ideas

Make a Kids Art Book

Melissa from The Artful Parent created a book with her kids artwork with PlumPrint and now its a prized possession in their house!

8. Magnetic Picture Frame Display

Give your fridge art display a makeover with DiY magnetic picture framesas Alysha shared on How Does She? Totally trying this soon!

ArtKive

Use the ArtKive app to photograph your childrens artwork from your smartphone and tag it with names, dates, and descriptions.

You can print a book of selected artworkswith practically just the shove of a button! Sounds like the busy moms solution to that book we every intend to create but dont get around to doing.

5. Matching Frames for a Cohesive Look

Use inexpensive frames to easily switch out the artwork and change what is displayed.  Anna from The Imagination Tree did this with her childrens art gallery. She used matching white IKEA frames in a variety of sizes for a cohesive glance. I LOVE that colorful cardboard Create sign she and her kids made!

2.

Kids Art Poster

Have Itsy Artturn your favorite kids art pieces into a poster. We were every pleased with how the posters turned out and the kids loved seeing their artwork displayed this way.

Tripod

Not to get too technical, but you’re going to set your camera to a extremely little aperture so that you can own the most depth of field your camera is capable of.

The width of the depth of field defines the area of sharp focus and to get to that you need the largest f/stop number your camera can obtain. Shutter speed and f/stop are related.

Since a larger f/stop number, love f/8, lets in less light, you’ll need to counter that by using a slower shutter speed to permit more light through.

When a camera has a slow shutter, you can’t hand hold it or the subject will be blurry, so a tripod is your answer. If you’re interested in learning more about the fundamentals of photography, check out this video I did with Harrington College of Design. I realize that most point-and-shoots may not permit you to select your f/stop.

That’s OK and there are ways to get around this, which I’ll discuss in the step-by-step.

Again, you shouldn’t need to spend a whole lot of money on a tripod at this point in your adventure and there are numerous, numerous options out there that are under $ I did a quick search on Amazon and found something that would work for $

9. Display Kids Art on Hangers

Use pants hangers to display kids artwork. How simple is that?!

The Honest Company blog shares enjoyment ideas for letting the kids decorate and personalize them first.

Diy large picture frame ideas

Tape

Depending on the table you finish up with, you can use tape or clamps to secure your board so that it sweeps properly.

Kids-Only Art Display Area or Stir Artwork Throughout Home

Have a kids art-only display area OR mix their art in with the other artwork you own hanging around the house.

7. Stylish Floating Wall Shelves

Use ledges or floating wall shelves for a kids art display area. Its simple to change out the artwork as Kate of Centsational Girl did.

You can simply prop up painted canvases, framed art pieces, and 3-D art. Attempt layering and moving them around as much as you love without putting unsightly holes in the walls.

Camera

You don’t need a crazy camera system. While shooting images with a Nikon D (~$2,) sporting a mm f lens ($) is awesome, it’s also totally unnecessary in this case.

Still, if you’re feeling excited and own the budget for a new camera system for this project, I propose reading a post I wrote on Quora, which offers tips to assist you pick out a excellent camera for product photography.

If every you own is your smartphone, that’s ok too.

Diy large picture frame ideas

Check out this helpful guide to smartphone product photography.

When I did the test images for this article, I started with my older model (), beat-to-hell Canon G10 point-and-shoot. I love the Canon G series point-and-shoots because they can go full manual and they shoot a really nice raw file. I picked this camera because it’s definitely not top of the line anymore, allowing me to protest that even with modest equipment, excellent results are attainable.

So what camera do you need?

I would just start out with whatever you own handy and see what the results are. It’s a common myth that it’s the camera that takes the pictures. In reality, the camera is only one piece of the whole. A photograph is made up of a series of choices that includes: lighting, exposure, styling, and post-processing.

Painted wall frames

Paint enjoyment and colorful frames directly on the wallas Christie from Childhood did.

6. Hanging Display Wire 

Use an IKEA wire curtain rod system to display the art. The one pictured is by Danielle on The Style Files; with a description of the IKEA set up on Apartment Therapy.

Or simply clip the artwork to a wirestretched between a couple of hook-eye screws as Kelli from Random Thoughts of a Super Mom did. So easy!

4. Cork Board Frames

Instead of removing the backs, you could simply replace the glass in a set of frames with cork from a roll of cork board as Lisa did from Grey Luster Girl. Now she has a bulletin board display wall for her kids art and can easily pin up new artworks anytime.

White bounce cards made of foam board

When you’re lighting with window light, there will be a bright side where the light is striking the product and a shadow side. This shadow side will typically be too dark and so we use something white to reflect the light back into the shadow, brightening it up. Foam board makes a grand bounce card because it’s rigid and white.

Alternatively, you can use black foam board to make the shadows deeper. This is particularly helpful if you’re shooting a white product on a white background.

Adding black foam board to the sides, just exterior of the photo, behind the product will create a dark edge on the white product. Combine a white bounce card at the front and black bounce cards in the back for a more sophisticated lighting setup.

You can purchase foam board on Amazon or at a local drugstore. Hold in mind this is just a white card, so you might be capable to balance a sheet of white printer paper or use a piece of poster board instead.

Table

A standard, inch wide folding table works best.

Clipboard Art Display

Group clipboards together as an art display area on the wall. It will make changing out the art super quick and simple as Jenn does at Clean and Scentsible. Or make your own display clipboardsas Liz did at Love Grows Wild.

White background

There are lots of options for a white background and if you’re going to be shooting a lot, you may desire to get a white sweep from Amazon.

I prefer a paper sweep because sweeps get dirty, and you can just cut off the dirty part and roll a new piece down.

A really cheap option is to go to your local drugstore or art store and purchase some poster board. I’ve seen it as low as $7 for 10 sheets of poster board. Remember to glance for pure white as off-white or cream will be more difficult.

Canvas Art Display

Transfer your childs artwork to canvas.

Wall decal & sticker frames

Or use removable wall decals if you desire something less permanent.

These colorful frame wall stickersare fun! As are thesefancy frame decals.

1. Display and Store Kids Artworks

Use kids art frames thatcombine a professional-looking frame with simple storage. Each of these frames doubles as storage for additional pieces of your childrens artwork.

Digital Frame

Or, how about a digital frame with a changing display of your childrens artworks? I wouldnt own thought of this one myself, but a reader says she does and loves it.

Display Art in Thrifted Frames

This is our own kids art display wall, made out of thrifted frames with the glass and backing removed. Were still loving it, and Ive shared a couple posts on Whats on the Kids Art Display Wall This Month showing how the artwork displayed has been changing.

Chalkboard Wall Art Gallery

Turn a chalkboard wall into a kids art galleryas shown on The Artful Kids blog.

DIY Frame Wallpaper

Make someDiY frame wallpaper where you desire your childrens art display, and let your kids draw, paint, and collage their art directly onto the wallpaper.

 Local Art Gallery

Do you belong to a kids frolic group, childrens art group, or preschool?

Considerhaving an art show at a local coffeeshop, bakery, or ice cream store for a period.

When you approach the owner/manager with your thought, make certain to mention that you can own a low-key reception for the young artists and their families. This translates to lots of people buying their muffins or ice cream cones! And the kids families will likely continue to visit throughout the month to see their art on display and share it with their friends and neighbors.

Vertical Hanging Artwork Display

Or, do as the folks at The Artful Kids blog did next and create a space-saving vertical display with hanging wires.

Which thought for ways to display kids artwork is your favorite?

Pin It for Later 

AboutJean Van’t Hul

Children’s Art Enabler, Mom of Two, Lover of Cherry Pie and Nature

The perceived worth of your products and the trustworthiness of your brand is often judged based on the quality of your visual presentation.

That means having high-quality, beautiful product photography can go a endless way.

However, not every store owner can afford to invest in a professional photography studio, especially when they’re just starting out. DIY product photography provides a grand alternative, and as endless as you know the proper tools and techniques, taking compelling product photos is well within your grasp.

But it’s not just aesthetics we’re talking about.

Diy large picture frame ideas

Showcasing your products with high-quality images can also be the difference between a conversion and no sale at every. This is particularly true if you’re also distributing your products on marketplace sites love Amazon, where your product photos are displayed alongside those of your competitors.

The perceived worth of your products is directly impacted by the quality of your product photography.

But when you’re just starting out, getting your product photos up to par can be intimidating because professional photography is often expensive.

There are hundreds of product photography tools to assist you get the occupation done yourself, though.

As a trade owner with lean startup roots, I understand this more than anyone. I also know that sometimes the money is just not there. If that’s you and your budget is tight, own you thought about taking the DIY approach to product photography? It’s not as hard as you might think.

There are lots of techniques for shooting successful product photos, but the one I’m going to show you is commonly known as The Window Light Technique. From someone who photographs products every day, this tutorial has been specifically crafted for trade owners on a budget.

It’s designed to be simple while producing excellent, high-quality results for most product types.

Enjoy!

Shopify Academy Course: Product Photography

Photographer Jeff Delacruz shares how you can create your own photo studio and take beautiful product photos for less than $

Enroll for free

Product photography equipment you’ll need

Gear is at the heart of photography and can be really exciting, but it can also be extremely confusing for newcomers.

There’s no need to spend a large portion of your budget on high-tech equipment, so hold an open mind and attempt not to overspend on gadgets that light your product no better than a $5 piece of card can, for example.

You can probably do this window light setup for $20 or less if you already own a camera.

You’re only going to need a few things for this setup.

The correct room

A room with windows next to a wall is perfect. The bigger the window, the more natural light you’ll get in. Being closer to the window will create a softer light with darker, softer shadows. Being farther away will give a more even light, but with lighter, sharper shadows.

Watch my full course inside Shopify Academy


Summary

There’s no general formula dictating what pictures you select to hang up or rules stating what you can combine them with.

However, before you put one of your pictures on the wall, you should ponder about every the possibilities for exhibiting it. Lay out picture clusters on the floor or sketch the arrangements until you discover the number of pictures, order and arrangement you’re happy with. When you’re ready, consider transforming your pictures into acrylic photo prints, or investing your wall arrangements with the elegance of our fine canvas prints.

Have a question or need guidance? Check out our FAQ or email us. Are you a professional photographer? Visit our professional pricing page.

Try these grand ways to display kids artwork that honor their creativity, glance excellent in your home, and are simple to switch out regularly with new artwork.

As parents, we are always looking for ways to display kids artwork.

You know, that mountain of creativity they draw, paint, collage at home and school.

Their artwork deserves a special display, but can often finish up in a pile despite excellent intentions. Im speaking for myself here, but from what I hear, Im not the only one.

Want to convert that stack of original kid creations into a display that honors their artwork and looks excellent in your home? Oh, and is simple to switch out as your children create new art or their art style develops and changes?

In this post Ill share lots of ways to display kids artwork. Some are ones we use or own used and others are ideas Ive admired.

They every fit as numerous of the above criteria as possible.

Especially the bit about being simple to switch out artwork as your children continue to create and to grow.


A Excellent Arrangement

To have put your pictures at the middle of attention where they’ll make the most possible impact, it’s a excellent thought to hang them at eye level. You should also consider whether the pictures will mostly be viewed when standing or when seated. As a general law, it’s advisable to position your pictures along lines, which could mean using existing contours in the room – door frames, furniture, window ledges, etc.

– or imaginary reference lines. If you desire to hang a picture on the side of the room, rather than in the middle of the wall, it’s significant to create a visual counterbalance with another piece of furniture or accessory. And while vertically arranged pictures will make your walls taller, the horizontally grouped images will make the room feel wider.


Our Wall Art Ideas Image Gallery:

Trend #4 On the Edge

In our example above, every of the pictures are oriented along the top edge. While the pictures themselves can be of varying length and width, the distance between the pictures should always be the same. For best results, lay the photo ensemble out on the floor before hanging it on the wall.

Using painter’s tape or string can really assist hold everything level. A level will also assist you align them.

Trend #3 Hung in a Row

Whether you line your pictures up vertically or horizontally, hanging them in a row is a classic way to arrange them. If you own pictures of varying sizes, you own two options. 1) You can align them along one of the edges, or 2) you can arrange them so that the middle of the images are every centered along the same imaginary line. Our tip: before drilling any holes in the wall, lay your pictures out on the floor first.

Trend #6 Inside the Lines

Here, the pictures are somewhat casually hung on the wall.

You don’t own to adhere to any equal distances between pictures, viewing axes, or edges. To give the image ensemble harmony here, arrange them in the confines of an imaginary geometric shape: circle, oval, rectangle, square, etc. When hanging the pictures, start with the largest one and then arrange the smaller pictures around it.

Trend #2 Salon Style

People often ponder of the gallery wall, wall cluster, or salon style hang as a form of “organized chaos” in which numerous closely packed images cover almost an entire wall.

The name “salon style” comes from the Parisian Salons of the 18th century.

Diy large picture frame ideas

Museums such as the Hermitage in St. Petersburg would later adopt this helpful of exhibition as a demonstration of overwhelming opulence. While this manner of hanging art may ignore traditional hanging lines, there are other factors that join the art. That could be pictures that are stylistically similar, similar or identical frames or mat boards, or pictures of a similar size. A thread that ties it every together brings a certain peacefulness to the wall: an organization to the chaos.

Trend #1 The Statement Piece

One wall, one picture.

A particularly grand photo, or one that you are especially fond of, deserves a put of honor. Whether the picture is a large canvas wrap or a little fine art print, if it has a whole wall to itself, it automatically becomes the middle of attention. You will desire to create a visual balance with your furnishings and observe physical proportions.

Trend #10 Divide Image

Four pictures, one image. A work of art divide into more than one piece is called a divide image (other common terms are “diptych” or “triptych”, depending on how numerous sections the picture is divide into).

To make certain the large picture lives up to its potential, the individual sections should be evenly aligned with extremely little space between them.

Trend #7 Symmetrical Display

We perceive symmetry as harmonic, which is why we naturally tend to arrange things symmetrically. The same goes for groups of pictures. For this type of symmetrical display, you will need at least three pictures, and two of them should be the same size. First, determine where your horizontal or vertical line of symmetry is going to be, then measure and position the pictures extremely carefully, as irregularities are particularly noticeable in this helpful of display.

Trend #11 Around the Corner

Hanging pictures around the corner is slightly out of the ordinary.

It can be a nice surprise for the viewer, who doesn’t experience the full effect of the composition until looking around the corner. For the best results, make certain the pictures complement each other, and that they are not too diverse in size or form. This is also a grand way to display diverse perspectives on the same subject.

Trend #8 Picture Ledge

Whether your pictures are standing along the floor or on a wall-mounting picture ledge, leaning them against the wall means you don’t own to drill any additional holes.

You can select from every kinds of pictures to go on ledges or to lean against the wall, and they give your wall more visual structure. Additionally, you can combine pictures on a ledge with other keepsakes and little home accessories. The biggest advantage of this helpful of display: pictures can be moved or rearranged at any time.

Trend #5 The Picture Grid

Much love a checkerboard, the photos here are arranged in a strict geometric pattern. The borders or frames of your pictures should line up along the edges and the distance between pictures should be the same in every directions. The Picture Grid works best when every of the pictures are the same size.

Identical frames create a particularly strong overall effect.

Trend #9 Diverse Perspectives

One subject as seen from diverse points of view. Create a special display by presenting several diverse takes on the same subject. This looks grand when the pictures are hung in a row, along an edge, symmetrically, or even hung around a corner.

Trend #12 Wall Collage

Collage is extremely favorite in the visual art world, probably because, as renowned philosopher Aristotle said: “The whole is more than the sum of its parts.” The collage is composed of numerous diverse images put together.

For your personal work of art, you can combine whatever you love, whether that’s photo prints, postcards, or fine art prints. You can do this directly on the wall, or you can mount the pictures on a backing panel first. Framing the ensemble is also a possibility.


Make Connections

For your pictures to harmonize with your furniture, proportions can be significant. An image that is too little can get lost next to a massive piece of furniture, but a picture that’s too large in comparison can also feel a bit overbearing. Walls that aren’t white are grand for displaying your photos. It is exceptionally harmonious if the walls, pictures, and accessories or furnishings contain similar hues.

While you can’t go incorrect with pictures against a white background, sometimes art on patterned or multicolored walls won’t live up to its potential. However, putting your photo in a really striking frame or mat board can be used to remedy this.


How to photograph your product on a white background

Alright, let’s get into the step-by-step process for shooting your product photos.

Step 3: Set up your camera

Every camera is a little diverse. Some cameras are fully auto and some own the ability to make adjustments. The beauty of this window light setup is that you can set everything to auto if you must and it will still work.

  • Turn your flash setting off.
  • Set your white balance (WB) to auto (AWB).
  • Set your image settings to the highest quality (RAW, if you own it.) Most point-and-shoot cameras don’t own the RAW setting, but if you do, then use it.

    This file is the largest the camera can shoot and it utilizes the full bit depth of the camera. You will own to edit in a software that reads RAW imagery (e.g. Photoshop, Bridge, Lightroom, Aperture), though.

  • Size. L- (large), M- (medium), S- (small). Pick large. This setting determines the file size and you almost always desire to shoot at its largest file size for optimal image quality. You can always shrink an image once it is taken, but you can’t make it larger.
  • Quality. S (superfine), F (fine), N (normal).

    You should always set it to superfine. This setting determines the number of pixels that are used on the camera sensor. Not using every the available pixels will render a lower quality image.

If you don’t own RAW, set it to the largest JPG setting you own. On my Canon, there are two settings to glance out for:

  1. Size. L- (large), M- (medium), S- (small). Pick large. This setting determines the file size and you almost always desire to shoot at its largest file size for optimal image quality.

    You can always shrink an image once it is taken, but you can’t make it larger.

  2. Quality. S (superfine), F (fine), N (normal). You should always set it to superfine. This setting determines the number of pixels that are used on the camera sensor. Not using every the available pixels will render a lower quality image.

Set your ISO to as well. The ISO controls the sensitivity of the sensor.

The higher the ISO, the more noise there is. Typically, the lowest ISO you can set your camera to is ISO , so set it there if you can.

Exposure Settings

Option A: Set your camera to Manual (M)
This is the best setting for this type of work because nothing will be moving or changing as you take the pictures. In Manual, change your f/stop to the highest number, which will give you the greatest depth of field.

Preview the image on the back of the camera through liveview. Everything is probably beautiful dark, which is ok. Now, switch to your shutter speed and rotate the dial to make it bright enough that the image is properly exposed.

Your shutter number should be going below as you do so.

For example, your number may go from 1/60 to 1/4. These are fractions of a second, which your shutter will be open for. As the number lowers, it will let more light in. Adjust this number until the preview of the image is correct.

Option B: Use aperture priority
Your camera may not own this either, but if it does, change the f/stop to the highest number. This should automatically adjust the shutter to be what the camera thinks it should be. This may be incorrect and you may need to use the exposure compensation dial to add light.

Option C: Auto exposure
If you’re stuck in the all-auto world, there may not be much you can do.

Don’t fret, it’s not a large deal. If you own an exposure compensation dial, you will most likely need to add +1 or + to get the correct exposure. If every you own is the running man images to select from, attempt picking something love sunset. With the iPhone, just tap the area you desire exposed properly.

Use the histogram on the back of the camera. You’re looking for the slope to be closer to the right-hand side, love in the image above.

💡Exposure Tip: Don’t believe the image on the back of the camera, instead pay attention to the histogram to know if your exposure is correct.

The far right-hand side is white and the left-hand side is black. In the example image above, there is a little gap on the right-hand side, which means that there is no pure white. Adjust the exposure until the part of the curve representing the white background is touching the correct edge without going over. In this example above, you would probably need to add 1/3 of a stop, or one click, for more light.

Zoom In

Cameras typically own an optical zoom and a digital zoom. Don’t use the digital zoom as this will lower the quality of the image because it’s essentially just cropping the digital image.

If you own an optical zoom, attempt zooming in as far as you can without going digital zoom. A longer zoom will remove distortion caused by a wide angle lens. Cell phones, for example, own a extremely wide angle lens, which is a common issue.

Step 2: Set up your sweep

There are a lot of ways to do this, but the ultimate goal is to own your sweep vertical. You may need to roll up the board to assist it reach that shape.

In my setup above, I placed the table against the wall, and taped the sweep to the wall and the table. If you don’t own a wall, you’re going to own to make something to secure the back of the sweep to.

Some bricks or a wooden block would work well.

Place your product in the middle on the flat part of the sweep and leave enough room to sneak your white reflector card in later. In this case, our product is a cool Skyrim & Doom toy available from Symbiote Studios. Thanks guys!

Step 4: Set up your product in the middle of the surface

Setting up your product is one of those things that seems simple, but can take time to perfect. If it’s a bottle, for example, you own to hold the label type centered. Often there are numerous tiny movements and adjustments required to get everything lined up perfectly.

Step 1: Set up your table

Once you own collected your gear, it’s time to set up your shooting area.

Put your table as shut to the window as possible without intersecting the shadow from the windowsill. You’ll desire to start with the window 90 degrees to the correct or left of your setup. The closer you are to the window and the larger the window, the softer the light will be.

Also, remember to turn off every other lights inside the room you’re shooting in as other light will contaminate the set. This is extremely significant and is the most common error I see.

You can attempt rotating the set so the window is at 45 degrees or attempt shooting with the window straight on for a diverse style of lighting.

Food photography, for example, is often shot with a window behind the setup and the camera shooting into the window for a more dramatic photo. Another variation is setting up in a garage with the door open, which will own the same qualities as a window, just without the glass.

You do not desire direct sunlight hitting your set. Direct sunlight is harsh, and looks bad on most models, mannequins, and products.

Step 5: Set up the reflector card

This simple white card is the single most significant light modifier we own in our studio and I use it for every shoot.

The light will bounce off the card and fill in every the shadows. How you position this card is a matter of taste, so attempt it at diverse angles to the product.

Step 6: Take the picture and evaluate

Once you take the picture, take some time and really glance at what you’ve created. This is where experience and education comes into frolic. What’s working, what isn’t working and what can you do to make it better?

Diy large picture frame ideas

Experiment with diverse methods of making your image better and, over time, your skills will naturally improve.

Upload your images to your computer to get a better thought of how they glance. The back of your camera is never extremely precise. I propose using Adobe Lightroom to organize every your images. It can also be used to do almost every of your editing except extremely advanced processes. You’ll no doubt need to make some adjustments to the images to get them to glance just right.

Post-production software love Adobe Lightroom is extremely in-depth and we don’t own time to go into the details of using it correct now because it’s simply too much.

You can also use free photo editing software for basic needs.

Step 7: Get your pictures retouched

Once you’ve got a final image you’re happy with, it’s time to get it retouched. If you photographed your product correctly, the product should be properly exposed and your background should be a light gray. It should glance something love the un-retouched images above. Comparing them to the retouched versions shows you how significant this step of the process actually is.

The retouching tasks associated with on-white photography can be tricky without a lot of training. So, instead of trying to teach you advanced Photoshop, I’m going to show you how to outsource it.

You’d be surprised how affordable this can be.

For $ an image, you can own a professional retouching company improve your images for you.

Finding a excellent company can be tough, but Pixelz is one of my favorite options. Their software allows you to upload and manage your retouching from start to finish. Prices start at $ per image with a $25 minimum, but you get three free test photos to start.

If you don’t own RAW, set it to the largest JPG setting you own. On my Canon, there are two settings to glance out for:

  1. Size. L- (large), M- (medium), S- (small). Pick large. This setting determines the file size and you almost always desire to shoot at its largest file size for optimal image quality.

    You can always shrink an image once it is taken, but you can’t make it larger.

  2. Quality. S (superfine), F (fine), N (normal). You should always set it to superfine. This setting determines the number of pixels that are used on the camera sensor. Not using every the available pixels will render a lower quality image.

Set your ISO to as well. The ISO controls the sensitivity of the sensor. The higher the ISO, the more noise there is. Typically, the lowest ISO you can set your camera to is ISO , so set it there if you can.

Exposure Settings

Option A: Set your camera to Manual (M)
This is the best setting for this type of work because nothing will be moving or changing as you take the pictures.

In Manual, change your f/stop to the highest number, which will give you the greatest depth of field.

Preview the image on the back of the camera through liveview. Everything is probably beautiful dark, which is ok. Now, switch to your shutter speed and rotate the dial to make it bright enough that the image is properly exposed.

Your shutter number should be going below as you do so. For example, your number may go from 1/60 to 1/4. These are fractions of a second, which your shutter will be open for.

Diy large picture frame ideas

As the number lowers, it will let more light in. Adjust this number until the preview of the image is correct.

Option B: Use aperture priority
Your camera may not own this either, but if it does, change the f/stop to the highest number.

Diy large picture frame ideas

This should automatically adjust the shutter to be what the camera thinks it should be. This may be incorrect and you may need to use the exposure compensation dial to add light.

Option C: Auto exposure
If you’re stuck in the all-auto world, there may not be much you can do. Don’t fret, it’s not a large deal. If you own an exposure compensation dial, you will most likely need to add +1 or + to get the correct exposure. If every you own is the running man images to select from, attempt picking something love sunset.

With the iPhone, just tap the area you desire exposed properly.

Use the histogram on the back of the camera. You’re looking for the slope to be closer to the right-hand side, love in the image above.

💡Exposure Tip: Don’t believe the image on the back of the camera, instead pay attention to the histogram to know if your exposure is correct. The far right-hand side is white and the left-hand side is black. In the example image above, there is a little gap on the right-hand side, which means that there is no pure white.

Adjust the exposure until the part of the curve representing the white background is touching the correct edge without going over. In this example above, you would probably need to add 1/3 of a stop, or one click, for more light.

Zoom In

Cameras typically own an optical zoom and a digital zoom. Don’t use the digital zoom as this will lower the quality of the image because it’s essentially just cropping the digital image. If you own an optical zoom, attempt zooming in as far as you can without going digital zoom. A longer zoom will remove distortion caused by a wide angle lens. Cell phones, for example, own a extremely wide angle lens, which is a common issue.

Step 2: Set up your sweep

There are a lot of ways to do this, but the ultimate goal is to own your sweep vertical.

You may need to roll up the board to assist it reach that shape.

In my setup above, I placed the table against the wall, and taped the sweep to the wall and the table. If you don’t own a wall, you’re going to own to make something to secure the back of the sweep to. Some bricks or a wooden block would work well.

Place your product in the middle on the flat part of the sweep and leave enough room to sneak your white reflector card in later.

In this case, our product is a cool Skyrim & Doom toy available from Symbiote Studios. Thanks guys!

Step 4: Set up your product in the middle of the surface

Setting up your product is one of those things that seems simple, but can take time to perfect. If it’s a bottle, for example, you own to hold the label type centered. Often there are numerous tiny movements and adjustments required to get everything lined up perfectly.

Step 1: Set up your table

Once you own collected your gear, it’s time to set up your shooting area. Put your table as shut to the window as possible without intersecting the shadow from the windowsill.

You’ll desire to start with the window 90 degrees to the correct or left of your setup. The closer you are to the window and the larger the window, the softer the light will be.

Also, remember to turn off every other lights inside the room you’re shooting in as other light will contaminate the set. This is extremely significant and is the most common error I see.

You can attempt rotating the set so the window is at 45 degrees or attempt shooting with the window straight on for a diverse style of lighting. Food photography, for example, is often shot with a window behind the setup and the camera shooting into the window for a more dramatic photo.

Another variation is setting up in a garage with the door open, which will own the same qualities as a window, just without the glass.

You do not desire direct sunlight hitting your set. Direct sunlight is harsh, and looks bad on most models, mannequins, and products.

Step 5: Set up the reflector card

This simple white card is the single most significant light modifier we own in our studio and I use it for every shoot. The light will bounce off the card and fill in every the shadows. How you position this card is a matter of taste, so attempt it at diverse angles to the product.

Step 6: Take the picture and evaluate

Once you take the picture, take some time and really glance at what you’ve created.

This is where experience and education comes into frolic. What’s working, what isn’t working and what can you do to make it better? Experiment with diverse methods of making your image better and, over time, your skills will naturally improve.

Upload your images to your computer to get a better thought of how they glance. The back of your camera is never extremely precise. I propose using Adobe Lightroom to organize every your images. It can also be used to do almost every of your editing except extremely advanced processes.

You’ll no doubt need to make some adjustments to the images to get them to glance just right.

Post-production software love Adobe Lightroom is extremely in-depth and we don’t own time to go into the details of using it correct now because it’s simply too much.

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You can also use free photo editing software for basic needs.

Step 7: Get your pictures retouched

Once you’ve got a final image you’re happy with, it’s time to get it retouched. If you photographed your product correctly, the product should be properly exposed and your background should be a light gray. It should glance something love the un-retouched images above. Comparing them to the retouched versions shows you how significant this step of the process actually is.

The retouching tasks associated with on-white photography can be tricky without a lot of training.

So, instead of trying to teach you advanced Photoshop, I’m going to show you how to outsource it.

You’d be surprised how affordable this can be. For $ an image, you can own a professional retouching company improve your images for you.

Finding a excellent company can be tough, but Pixelz is one of my favorite options. Their software allows you to upload and manage your retouching from start to finish. Prices start at $ per image with a $25 minimum, but you get three free test photos to start.


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