Diy toothpick ideas

Have you ever cut open a loaf of banana bread (or any quick bread, for that matter), and found, to your grand chagrin, a sphere of gooey, raw batter in the center?

You sigh; you salvage both ends of the loaf. But there’s no choice except to cut the heart out of your bread (literally!), and throw it away.

How unhappy is that?

What’s the best way to ensure that your banana bread, pumpkin bread, or zucchini bread is baked every the way through — the middle perfect, the sides not tough and overbaked, the top crust a deep golden brown but not burned?

Here are five things you can do to ensure that banana bread — or any quick bread — is perfectly baked every time.

Make certain your oven is calibrated correctly

If your recipe calls for baking bread at °F, and your oven’s actual temperature is °F (despite it being set to °F), your bread isn’t going to be done when you ponder it is.

Solution: at least one external (portable) oven thermometer, a thermometer you can hang from (or relax on) your oven’s middle rack.

I use two thermometers, so I can double check them against one another; if they register the same temperature (or within a few degrees), then I know they’re accurately reading the oven’s temperature.

Preheat your oven thoroughly

My oven tells me (BEEP!) it’s fully preheated in 10 minutes. Liar liar, pants on fire! It actually takes my oven almost 25 minutes of preheating to reach °F.

How do you know when your oven is fully preheated?

Set your oven temperature to °F, and turn it on.

Start a timer. Use an external (portable) oven thermometer (see above) to accurately gauge the oven’s temperature.

When your oven reaches the desired temperature, stop the timer and see how endless it took. Going forward, assume this quantity of time is necessary for preheating.

Obviously the time will vary depending on what temperature you’re preheating to, but the quantity of time needed to preheat your oven to °F is a excellent benchmark.

Position the pan in the oven optimally

I used to own a lot of trouble with my quick breads having a thin raw layer correct at the top.

Solution? Moving the oven rack up a notch, so it’s closer to the heating element (6” from element to pan rim; yes, I measured). To prevent the top crust from burning, I tent the bread with aluminum foil for the final third of its baking time (typically 20 to 25 minutes).

Now, that’s what works for me; if you own an oven with a bottom heating element, you may desire to position the pan closer to the bottom — or not. Experiment until you discover the best spot in your oven for optimal quick-bread baking.

Test for doneness using a thermometer

You know how you stick a toothpick or cake tester into the middle of a baking cake to see if it’s done?

This works with quick breads, as well — some of the time.

Other times, if the batter is “textured” with bits of banana or zucchini, or added chips or dried fruit, the test is unreliable.

Instead of using a cake tester or toothpick to test quick bread, attempt using a thin-bladed knife (like a paring knife). Shove the blade into the center; draw it out. You may or may not see any wet batter or moist crumbs clinging to the blade.

Repeat the test; I’ve found that oftentimes the first insertion doesn’t yield any telltale wet batter, but the second one does.

If after two or three attempts the knife doesn’t show any wet batter, you’re probably excellent to go.

Probably.

The only truly dependable tool I’ve found for testing the doneness of quick bread is a digital thermometer.

When you ponder your bread is done, stick the thermometer straight below through the top-center of the loaf. Gradually draw it out, checking readings along the way. You’ll see the temperature drop as the probe moves from bottom to middle, then rise again as you start to withdraw it.

When the middle of your bread is baked through a thermometer will register between °F and °F. No part of your loaf should be under °F — except perhaps the extremely top, which may produce an unreliable reading due to the thermometer’s tip being partially exposed to room-temperature air.

Note: For those of you baking gluten-free quick breads, your finished temperature should be °F to °F.

Know your own oven, pan, and recipe — and take notes

Did you ever wonder why your mom’s brownies are always perfect and yours are always overbaked?

Because you’re using her recipe, and your mom’s oven might bake extremely differently than your own.

Diy toothpick ideas

Know your oven.

Your favorite ancient glass pan might bake more slowly than that new stainless steel pan you tried; which in turn will bake more slowly than your workhorse aluminum pan. Know your pan.

Your zucchini bread seems to bake more quickly than pumpkin bread. And that lemon bread? Done WAY before your banana bread. Know your recipe.

The takeaway here? Take notes as you bake: what pan you use, how endless you preheat your oven, where you position your oven rack, whether or not you tent the loaf with aluminum foil towards the finish.

Are you adding chocolate chips? Substituting honey for some of the brown sugar?

Any change you make to your original recipe may change its baking time.

Write those changes below. And next time you bake your favorite banana bread you won’t own to wonder, “Is it done?” You’ll know.

Can underbaked quick bread be saved?

If you’ve cut into a loaf of quick bread and discovered its middle is raw, it’s no use putting it back into the oven. Its edges and crust will dry out before the interior cooks.

Better to cut that soggy interior into slices and cook them on a griddle. Fry up some bacon, plate your banana «French toast,» and no one will be the wiser!

Want to customize this banana bread to YOUR taste? Use our interactive recipe generator to tweak the ingredients and create your extremely own personalized banana bread recipe!

The Author

About PJ Hamel

PJ Hamel grew up in New England, graduated from Brown University, and was a Maine journalist before joining King Arthur Flour in PJ bakes and writes from her home on Cape Cod, where she enjoys beach-walking, her husband, two dogs, and really excellent food!

View every posts by PJ Hamel

Whether you’re throwing a dinner party, cocktail hour, or a bash to celebrate game day, epic appetizers are a *must* for any get-together.

If you desire to take your bite-sized appetizer recipes a bit further, skewer those tasty bites with a toothpick so your guests can grab and go as they please. It also means you aren’t left with tons of dishes, so you can spend more time relaxing in that post-party glow. Scroll below for 25 finger food recipes, from BLTs to chicken and waffles… every that you can serve on a toothpick!


Spicy Shrimp and Sausage Skewers

Bring the flavors of New Orleans to your shindig with these Cajun-style skewers.

Serve with a spicy lemon aioli for dipping and ice-cold beer for sipping. (via Iowa Girl Eats)

Rosemary Pineapple Mozzarella Bites

Using a rosemary stem as a skewer to hold your pineapple and mozzarella is both practical and yummy. Not to mention, the presentation is beautiful spectacular. (via Cook. Craft. Love.)

Simple Pesto Tortellini Skewers

If you can boil water, you can make these skewers faster than you can tell tortellini.

Dress with pesto and sun-dried tomatoes for optimal flavor. (via Foody Schmoody Blog)

Manchego Cheese, Ham, and Olive Bites

These no-cook tapas bites are a quick way to wow a crowd with minimal effort. Attempt drizzling with honey after assembling for an added sweet touch. (via My Kitchen Love)

Cured Brown Sugar Salmon Skewers

Succulent salmon is even tastier when it’s coated in brown sugar.

Diy toothpick ideas

Give the fish a quick sear, and each bite will be infused with smokey, caramelized flavor. (via Sprinkles and Sprouts)

Filet Mignon Rosemary Skewers

Here’s another way to use some fragrant rosemary sprigs.

Diy toothpick ideas

Skewer juicy prime rib, roasted mushrooms, and red pepper, so each bite is infused with that woodsy rosemary aroma. (via Give It Some Thyme)

Dill Pickle Beef Skewers

A marinade of pickle juice keeps the beef in these skewers ultra-tender and seasoned throughout. Spear with a toothpick along with a tiny gherkin and some unused dill for a hearty party bite. (via Sprinkles and Sprouts)

Saucy Asian Meatballs

Saucy meatballs are a party must-have. It’s doubtful you’ll own leftovers, but if you do, serve them over rice for lunch the next day. (via Gimme Some Oven)

Chicken Caesar Salad Pinwheels

When you’re serving passable dishes, salads can be a bit too fussy for their own excellent.

Get that creamy crunch you desire in an easy-to-eat package by rolling chicken Caesar salad in a tortilla and slicing into pinwheels. (via Food Enjoyment Family)

Instructions

  • Place marshmallow in middle of chocolate covered cookie. Carefully remove toothpick. Touch up the toothpick hole with a little dab of melted chocolate, if desired.
  • Coat green candy band with sprinkles or sparkles. Shake off excess.
  • Melt green candy just as you did the chocolate.

    Diy toothpick ideas

    Flip marshmallow upside below and insert new toothpick in top. Dip into green candy, just barely, to create a little band of green around the bottom.

  • Using a toothpick, dip marshmallow into chocolate and jacket almost entirely. Shake off any excess. Set on parchment paper, until candy coating is completely set.

    Diy toothpick ideas

    Remove toothpick.

  • To finish the cap, attach a glittering shamrock with a little dab of melted green.
  • Spoon some of the remaining melted green candy into a piping bag, ziplock bag or squeeze bottle. On parchment paper, make three little dots of candy in the shape of a triangle. Each dot should be about the size of a chocolate chip. Using a toothpick, swirl the three dots together to form a shamrock shape. Swirl the bottom two dots together first, then the top dot.

    Tug toothpick straight below to form the stem. Before candy hardens, cover with sprinkles or crushed cake sparkles. Once shamrocks own set up, dust off excess sparkle.

  • Melt dark chocolate candy in the microwave, in 30 second intervals on 50% power. Stir after each heating. Repeat until completely melted. Dip Fudge Stripe Cookies into chocolate, coating completely. Shake off any excess. Set on parchment paper, top side below, until candy coating is completely set.
  • Your finished treats can be stored for several days in an airtight container, at room temperature.

Grilled Garlic Shrimp Skewers

Simplicity is essential when dealing with sweet, unused shrimp.

A brush of garlic and butter is every you need to enhance its flavor to epic restaurant-worthy levels. (via Simply Recipes)

Hawaiian Chicken Bites

Bring your favorite pizza toppings into cocktail hour with these sweet and sour Hawaiian chicken skewers. Brush with your favorite BBQ sauce and add a chunk of SPAM for an authentic flavor. (via Rasa Malaysia)

Antipasto Skewers

If you or your party guests are wine lovers, you can’t go incorrect with salty antipasto skewers.

(via Tabitha Talks Food)

Chicken Satay Skewers With Peanut Sauce

Chicken marinated in coconut milk and spices becomes tender and moist on the grill. Pair these skewers with a sweet and sticky peanut sauce for additional flavor. (via Savory Tooth)

BBQ Chicken Skewers With Blue Cheese Crumbles

If you love blue cheese and celery but not the usual spicy Buffalo counterpart, these BBQ chicken skewers will be correct up your alley.

They’re sweet and saucy with a sharp bite and a unused crunch. (via Stacey Homemaker)

Notes

  1. Your finished treats can be stored for several days in an airtight container, at room temperature.

Bacon Cream Cheese Bites

You can create an incredibly simple app with only bread, cream cheese, chives, and bacon that will stun your guests. (via Garnish With Lemon)

Beet Salad on a Stick

Whatever get-together you own planned, you need to own a couple of vegetarian options up your sleeve. Relax assured, your herbivorous friends will flip for this bite-sized combo of beet, goat cheese, arugula, and walnut. (via Salty Canary)

Wedge Salad Skewers

If you own to eat a salad, it might as well be on a stick.

Plus, the topping-to-lettuce ratio here is way more appealing than the alternative. (via Love & Zest)

Oven-Baked Greek Meatballs

A platter of these savory Greek meatballs is a hearty appetizer for your party guests. Serve them alongside creamy tzatziki sauce. (via A Fork’s Tale)

Key concepts
Sound
Waves
Hearing

From National Science Education Standards: Transfer of energy

Introduction
Own you ever tried to own a conversation with someone so far away that you couldn’t really hear each other?

Without yelling, it’s hard to own a conversation over endless distances. So these days it’s nice to be capable to use telephones to talk with someone—whether he or she is yards or miles away.

Back before there were cell phones or even cordless phones, every telephones were hooked up to wires that helped to carry the sound of a person’s voice (via an electric signal). And you can use the same concept to build your own telephone using just cups and some string.

What message are you going to share over the string?

Background
When we talk, our vocal cords make molecules in the air vibrate. (You can feel the vibrations by holding your hand against your throat while you talk.) Those vibrating air molecules make other air molecules around them vibrate, and so on, which is how sound travels through the air. (Different pitches of sound move in waves that own diverse spacing between them—or "frequency.") Other sources of sound, such as guitar, violin or piano strings are excellent examples of how vibrations can generate sound.

Inside our ears are tiny sensitive hairs.

They pick up the vibrations and transmit that information to our brains, which interpret it as sound. The brain interprets sounds as having diverse pitches, or tones, based on the frequency, or spacing, of the waves.

But the particles in air are spread out from one another more than particles in a liquid or solid. So sound vibrations tend to peter out before they travel extremely far. Having a soft connective material, such as cotton string—which has a higher density, or number of molecules in a given quantity of space, than air—can assist the sound waves move over a greater distance.

Materials
•Two large paper cups (disposable plastic cups will also work)
•Two paperclips or toothpicks
•Length of cotton string or fishing line approximately 10 to 30 feet long
•Quiet area

Preparation
•Punch a little hole in middle of the bottom of each cup (for plastic cups, you might need a nail or other sharp tool, so use caution when completing this step).
•Thread one finish of string through the bottom of each cup.
•Place a paperclip or toothpick in the bottom of each cup and tie the loose finish of the string around it (the clip or pick is just here to hold the string from slipping through the bottom of the cup).

Procedure
•Give one cup to your conversation partner and hold one yourself.
•Walk slowly apart until the string connecting the cups is straight and tight.
•Put your cup over your ear and own your partner talk into his or her cup (keep the conversation relatively silent if you are standing shut to one another, but be certain to talk louder than a whisper).
Can you hear your partner talking?


•Now you attempt talking into your cup and own your partner hear into his or her cup. Can he or she hear you?
•Try letting the string go slack. Is the cup-and-string telephone still effective?
•Now, keeping your voice at the same level and remaining the same distance apart, attempt talking to each other without using the cups. Can you hear as well?
Extra: If you own plenty of space, see how far apart you can get the cup-and-string telephone to work.
Extra: If you own a third person around, enquire them to hold on to the middle of the string with their hand.

Will the sound still carry through? Why or why not?
Extra: If you own other materials (such as yarn, fishing line, nylon string, etc.) on hand, attempt them out. How do diverse materials change the quality of sound or how far the sound will travel?

Read on for observations, results and more resources.

Observations and results
Could you hear your partner better using the cups and tight string than if you were speaking to each other in the same volume over the air?

In this activity, your voice vibrated the air inside of the cup, which in turn made the bottom of the cup vibrate.

These vibrations were transferred to the string and then into the bottom of your partner’s cup, which made the air inside of his or her cup vibrate and become detectable sound. When the string goes slack, the vibrations dissipate more easily and get lost along the way. (Landline phones work on the same thought but they transfer the sound waves into an electrical signal, which can travel even farther over wires—and the landlines don’t own to be kept taut.)

Sound, such as human lecture, travels in incredibly little waves—incredibly quick (about 1, feet per second), which is why you couldn’t see it or detect a delay while it traveled across the cups and string.

Have you ever noticed how things sound diverse underwater?

Because water’s molecules are packed together more closely than those in air, sound waves move more easily—faster and farther—under water. Whales and other marine animals that use sound to communicate under water take advantage of this fact. Scientists ponder whales can hear each other from hundreds (and maybe even thousands) of miles away—without even a string telephone!

Share your string telephone observations and results! Leave a comment under or share your photos and feedback on Scientific American‘s page.

Cleanup
Untie or cut the string from the paperclips or toothpicks.

Recycle or reuse what materials you can.

More to explore
"Ear Cells Actively Amplify Sound" from Scientific American
"(Don’t) Pump Up the Volume: Sound Waves Silence Whales’ Song" from Scientific American
"Sound" Activities from The NASA Sci Files
"Frequency, Wavelength and Pitch" overview from Connexions
Sounds Every Around by Wendy Pfeffer, ages
Janice VanCleave’s Physics for Every Kid: simple experiments in motion, heat, light, machines and sound by Janice VanCleave, ages

Up next…
Yeast Alive!

Watch Yeast Live and Breathe

What you’ll need
•Fresh packet of baker’s yeast (check the expiration date)
•Tablespoon of sugar
•Clear plastic bottle with a little opening (such as a water bottle)
• Funnel
•Small balloon
•Warm water

Leprechaun Cap S’mores a festive St. Patricks day treat that the kids will love! Make this simple green dessert for your St. Patricks Day party!

St. Patricks Day is just around the corner this Saturday to be exact. To assist you celebrate, Ive created a new DIY treat full of sweet goodness and glittering shamrocks!

I shared it over on the fabulous Hostess Blog and will share it here as well! So whether youre planning a large green bash or simply desire a treat to enjoy at home, these are festive and magically yummy. Theyre my Leprechaun Cap Smores!

Delicious as they are cute, these little hats would be the perfect addition to any St. Patty’s Day dessert table. A Fudge Stripe Cookie base is topped with a marshmallow and then coated in chocolate to create one yummy little s’more hat! Simple enough for your little leprechauns to assist make too (if you don’t mind gooey hands!).

Let’s take a peek inside, shall we?

In a few simple steps, you’ll be kicking up your heels and dancing the jig, wishing that every rainbow ended in a plate of these adorable s’mores!

Diy toothpick ideas

So lets get to it heres how to make them!

LEPRECHAUN Cap S’MORES
a DIY by Carrie Sellman

Ingredients:

STEP 1 :   Melt dark chocolate candy in the microwave, in 30 second intervals on 50% power. Stir after each heating. Repeat until completely melted. Dip Fudge Stripe Cookies into chocolate, coating completely. Shake off any excess. Set on parchment paper, top side below, until candy coating is completely set.

STEP 2 :  Using a toothpick, dip marshmallow into chocolate and jacket almost entirely. Shake off any excess.

Set on parchment paper, until candy coating is completely set. Remove toothpick.

STEP 3 :  Melt green candy just as you did the chocolate. Flip marshmallow upside below and insert new toothpick in top. Dip into green candy, just barely, to create a little band of green around the bottom.

STEP 4 :  Coat green candy band with sprinkles or sparkles. Shake off excess.

STEP 5 :  Place marshmallow in middle of chocolate covered cookie. Carefully remove toothpick. Touch up the toothpick hole with a little dab of melted chocolate, if desired.

STEP 6 :  Spoon some of the remaining melted green candy into a piping bag, ziplock bag or squeeze bottle.

On parchment paper, make three little dots of candy in the shape of a triangle. Each dot should be about the size of a chocolate chip. Using a toothpick, swirl the three dots together to form a shamrock shape. Swirl the bottom two dots together first, then the top dot. Tug toothpick straight below to form the stem. Before candy hardens, cover with sprinkles or crushed cake sparkles. Once shamrocks own set up, dust off excess sparkle.

STEP 7 :  To finish the cap, attach a glittering shamrock with a little dab of melted green.

Your finished treats can be stored for several days in an airtight container, at room temperature.

Whether your family heritage goes back to Ireland or not were every Irish on March 17th! So get your green on and whip up some of these yummy Leprechaun Cap Smores for your little munchkins! Happy St. Patrick’s Day!

Print

Leprechaun Cap Smores

Leprechaun Cap S’mores a festive St. Patricks day treat that the kids will love!

Bacon, Lettuce and Tomato Tea Sandwich

Endless live the BLT! To turn it into a bite-sized nosh, go for slices of Roma tomatoes and use a cookie cutter to create like-sized circles of white bread. (via Oh, How Civilized)

Mini Chicken and Waffles

There’s no shame in using frozen food to your advantage, especially when you own the task of hosting a party.

Dress up mini waffles and chicken tenders with maple syrup and herbs de Provence, and no one will be the wiser. (via Almost Makes Perfect)

Mini Cheeseburgers

If you really desire to make a statement with your party food, go every out and whip up mini cheeseburgers. (via Pizzazzerie)

Glazed Green Bean Bundles

Glazed in a buttery brown sugar sauce, any vegetable suddenly becomes enjoyment to eat. Add a crispy wrapping of salty prosciutto, and these once-humble green beans are now totally party worthy.

(via Blackberry Babe)

Did you make this recipe?

Tag @thecakeblog on Instagram and hashtag it #thecakeblog


MORE ST. PATRICKS DAY RECIPES TO TRY:

by Carrie Sellman

I know its still September but Im already getting in the mood for every things creepy and crawly and scary of Halloween. Own you checked out the new book, Candy Aisle Crafts by previous editor of Martha Stewart Living, Jodi Levine? Im just drooling over every the amazing food craft projects.

Diy toothpick ideas

I dont remember the final time a book has been more inspiring to me. Jodi graciously offered to share one of my favorite projects from the book here today, these monster smores! Arent they amazing? Hold reading to see how to make them with your kids (or for yourself!)

Photography by Amy Gropp Forbes. Project by Jodi Levine 

Supplies
• parchment paper
• assorted flat cookies (such as honey or chocolate graham crackers, Nabisco Renowned Chocolate Wafers, and tea biscuits)
• thin flat chocolate bars (such as Hershey’s)
• scissors
• regular and mini marshmallows
• toothpick
• regular and mini chocolate chips

Instructions
1.

Preheat the broiler.
2. Line a baking sheet with parchment paper. Arrange the cookies on the baking sheet and put a piece of the chocolate bar on top of each one.
3. To make the eyes, cut mini or regular marshmallows in half horizontally. Arrange the halves on top of the chocolate, sticky side below. Poke holes in the marshmallows with the toothpick, and dig around to magnify the holes. Shove a mini or regular chocolate chip into each hole, pointy side down.
4.

To make the teeth, cut angled pieces off the remaining mini or regular marshmallows and press the cut sides into the chocolate.
5. Put the baking sheet in the oven and watch carefully. Remove as soon as the s’mores turn golden, about 45 seconds. They turn golden extremely quickly, in as quick as 45 seconds, and can burn before you know it, so stay correct next to the oven with your oven mitt on! Let them cool until they’re just warm before handling or eating.

Thanks for sharing a craft from your beautiful book, Jodi. You can purchase it correct here for $

Grilled Garlic Shrimp Skewers

Simplicity is essential when dealing with sweet, unused shrimp.

A brush of garlic and butter is every you need to enhance its flavor to epic restaurant-worthy levels. (via Simply Recipes)

Hawaiian Chicken Bites

Bring your favorite pizza toppings into cocktail hour with these sweet and sour Hawaiian chicken skewers. Brush with your favorite BBQ sauce and add a chunk of SPAM for an authentic flavor. (via Rasa Malaysia)

Antipasto Skewers

If you or your party guests are wine lovers, you can’t go incorrect with salty antipasto skewers.

(via Tabitha Talks Food)

Chicken Satay Skewers With Peanut Sauce

Chicken marinated in coconut milk and spices becomes tender and moist on the grill. Pair these skewers with a sweet and sticky peanut sauce for additional flavor. (via Savory Tooth)

BBQ Chicken Skewers With Blue Cheese Crumbles

If you love blue cheese and celery but not the usual spicy Buffalo counterpart, these BBQ chicken skewers will be correct up your alley. They’re sweet and saucy with a sharp bite and a unused crunch. (via Stacey Homemaker)

Notes

  1. Your finished treats can be stored for several days in an airtight container, at room temperature.

Bacon Cream Cheese Bites

You can create an incredibly simple app with only bread, cream cheese, chives, and bacon that will stun your guests.

(via Garnish With Lemon)

Beet Salad on a Stick

Whatever get-together you own planned, you need to own a couple of vegetarian options up your sleeve. Relax assured, your herbivorous friends will flip for this bite-sized combo of beet, goat cheese, arugula, and walnut. (via Salty Canary)

Wedge Salad Skewers

If you own to eat a salad, it might as well be on a stick. Plus, the topping-to-lettuce ratio here is way more appealing than the alternative. (via Love & Zest)

Oven-Baked Greek Meatballs

A platter of these savory Greek meatballs is a hearty appetizer for your party guests. Serve them alongside creamy tzatziki sauce.

(via A Fork’s Tale)

Key concepts
Sound
Waves
Hearing

From National Science Education Standards: Transfer of energy

Introduction
Own you ever tried to own a conversation with someone so far away that you couldn’t really hear each other? Without yelling, it’s hard to own a conversation over endless distances. So these days it’s nice to be capable to use telephones to talk with someone—whether he or she is yards or miles away.

Back before there were cell phones or even cordless phones, every telephones were hooked up to wires that helped to carry the sound of a person’s voice (via an electric signal).

And you can use the same concept to build your own telephone using just cups and some string. What message are you going to share over the string?

Background
When we talk, our vocal cords make molecules in the air vibrate. (You can feel the vibrations by holding your hand against your throat while you talk.) Those vibrating air molecules make other air molecules around them vibrate, and so on, which is how sound travels through the air. (Different pitches of sound move in waves that own diverse spacing between them—or "frequency.") Other sources of sound, such as guitar, violin or piano strings are excellent examples of how vibrations can generate sound.

Inside our ears are tiny sensitive hairs.

They pick up the vibrations and transmit that information to our brains, which interpret it as sound. The brain interprets sounds as having diverse pitches, or tones, based on the frequency, or spacing, of the waves.

But the particles in air are spread out from one another more than particles in a liquid or solid. So sound vibrations tend to peter out before they travel extremely far. Having a soft connective material, such as cotton string—which has a higher density, or number of molecules in a given quantity of space, than air—can assist the sound waves move over a greater distance.

Materials
•Two large paper cups (disposable plastic cups will also work)
•Two paperclips or toothpicks
•Length of cotton string or fishing line approximately 10 to 30 feet long
•Quiet area

Preparation
•Punch a little hole in middle of the bottom of each cup (for plastic cups, you might need a nail or other sharp tool, so use caution when completing this step).
•Thread one finish of string through the bottom of each cup.
•Place a paperclip or toothpick in the bottom of each cup and tie the loose finish of the string around it (the clip or pick is just here to hold the string from slipping through the bottom of the cup).

Procedure
•Give one cup to your conversation partner and hold one yourself.
•Walk slowly apart until the string connecting the cups is straight and tight.
•Put your cup over your ear and own your partner talk into his or her cup (keep the conversation relatively silent if you are standing shut to one another, but be certain to talk louder than a whisper).
Can you hear your partner talking?


•Now you attempt talking into your cup and own your partner hear into his or her cup. Can he or she hear you?
•Try letting the string go slack. Is the cup-and-string telephone still effective?
•Now, keeping your voice at the same level and remaining the same distance apart, attempt talking to each other without using the cups. Can you hear as well?
Extra: If you own plenty of space, see how far apart you can get the cup-and-string telephone to work.
Extra: If you own a third person around, enquire them to hold on to the middle of the string with their hand.

Will the sound still carry through? Why or why not?
Extra: If you own other materials (such as yarn, fishing line, nylon string, etc.) on hand, attempt them out. How do diverse materials change the quality of sound or how far the sound will travel?

Read on for observations, results and more resources.

Observations and results
Could you hear your partner better using the cups and tight string than if you were speaking to each other in the same volume over the air?

In this activity, your voice vibrated the air inside of the cup, which in turn made the bottom of the cup vibrate.

These vibrations were transferred to the string and then into the bottom of your partner’s cup, which made the air inside of his or her cup vibrate and become detectable sound. When the string goes slack, the vibrations dissipate more easily and get lost along the way. (Landline phones work on the same thought but they transfer the sound waves into an electrical signal, which can travel even farther over wires—and the landlines don’t own to be kept taut.)

Sound, such as human lecture, travels in incredibly little waves—incredibly quick (about 1, feet per second), which is why you couldn’t see it or detect a delay while it traveled across the cups and string.

Have you ever noticed how things sound diverse underwater?

Because water’s molecules are packed together more closely than those in air, sound waves move more easily—faster and farther—under water. Whales and other marine animals that use sound to communicate under water take advantage of this fact. Scientists ponder whales can hear each other from hundreds (and maybe even thousands) of miles away—without even a string telephone!

Share your string telephone observations and results! Leave a comment under or share your photos and feedback on Scientific American‘s page.

Cleanup
Untie or cut the string from the paperclips or toothpicks. Recycle or reuse what materials you can.

More to explore
"Ear Cells Actively Amplify Sound" from Scientific American
"(Don’t) Pump Up the Volume: Sound Waves Silence Whales’ Song" from Scientific American
"Sound" Activities from The NASA Sci Files
"Frequency, Wavelength and Pitch" overview from Connexions
Sounds Every Around by Wendy Pfeffer, ages
Janice VanCleave’s Physics for Every Kid: simple experiments in motion, heat, light, machines and sound by Janice VanCleave, ages

Up next…
Yeast Alive!

Watch Yeast Live and Breathe

What you’ll need
•Fresh packet of baker’s yeast (check the expiration date)
•Tablespoon of sugar
•Clear plastic bottle with a little opening (such as a water bottle)
• Funnel
•Small balloon
•Warm water

Leprechaun Cap S’mores a festive St. Patricks day treat that the kids will love! Make this simple green dessert for your St. Patricks Day party!

St. Patricks Day is just around the corner this Saturday to be exact.

To assist you celebrate, Ive created a new DIY treat full of sweet goodness and glittering shamrocks! I shared it over on the fabulous Hostess Blog and will share it here as well! So whether youre planning a large green bash or simply desire a treat to enjoy at home, these are festive and magically yummy. Theyre my Leprechaun Cap Smores!

Delicious as they are cute, these little hats would be the perfect addition to any St. Patty’s Day dessert table. A Fudge Stripe Cookie base is topped with a marshmallow and then coated in chocolate to create one yummy little s’more hat! Simple enough for your little leprechauns to assist make too (if you don’t mind gooey hands!).

Let’s take a peek inside, shall we?

In a few simple steps, you’ll be kicking up your heels and dancing the jig, wishing that every rainbow ended in a plate of these adorable s’mores!

So lets get to it heres how to make them!

LEPRECHAUN Cap S’MORES
a DIY by Carrie Sellman

Ingredients:

STEP 1 :   Melt dark chocolate candy in the microwave, in 30 second intervals on 50% power. Stir after each heating. Repeat until completely melted. Dip Fudge Stripe Cookies into chocolate, coating completely. Shake off any excess. Set on parchment paper, top side below, until candy coating is completely set.

STEP 2 :  Using a toothpick, dip marshmallow into chocolate and jacket almost entirely.

Shake off any excess. Set on parchment paper, until candy coating is completely set. Remove toothpick.

STEP 3 :  Melt green candy just as you did the chocolate. Flip marshmallow upside below and insert new toothpick in top. Dip into green candy, just barely, to create a little band of green around the bottom.

STEP 4 :  Coat green candy band with sprinkles or sparkles. Shake off excess.

STEP 5 :  Place marshmallow in middle of chocolate covered cookie.

Carefully remove toothpick. Touch up the toothpick hole with a little dab of melted chocolate, if desired.

STEP 6 :  Spoon some of the remaining melted green candy into a piping bag, ziplock bag or squeeze bottle. On parchment paper, make three little dots of candy in the shape of a triangle. Each dot should be about the size of a chocolate chip. Using a toothpick, swirl the three dots together to form a shamrock shape. Swirl the bottom two dots together first, then the top dot. Tug toothpick straight below to form the stem.

Before candy hardens, cover with sprinkles or crushed cake sparkles. Once shamrocks own set up, dust off excess sparkle.

STEP 7 :  To finish the cap, attach a glittering shamrock with a little dab of melted green.

Your finished treats can be stored for several days in an airtight container, at room temperature. Whether your family heritage goes back to Ireland or not were every Irish on March 17th! So get your green on and whip up some of these yummy Leprechaun Cap Smores for your little munchkins!

Happy St. Patrick’s Day!

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Leprechaun Cap Smores

Leprechaun Cap S’mores a festive St. Patricks day treat that the kids will love!

Bacon, Lettuce and Tomato Tea Sandwich

Endless live the BLT! To turn it into a bite-sized nosh, go for slices of Roma tomatoes and use a cookie cutter to create like-sized circles of white bread. (via Oh, How Civilized)

Mini Chicken and Waffles

There’s no shame in using frozen food to your advantage, especially when you own the task of hosting a party.

Dress up mini waffles and chicken tenders with maple syrup and herbs de Provence, and no one will be the wiser. (via Almost Makes Perfect)

Mini Cheeseburgers

If you really desire to make a statement with your party food, go every out and whip up mini cheeseburgers. (via Pizzazzerie)

Glazed Green Bean Bundles

Glazed in a buttery brown sugar sauce, any vegetable suddenly becomes enjoyment to eat.

Diy toothpick ideas

Add a crispy wrapping of salty prosciutto, and these once-humble green beans are now totally party worthy. (via Blackberry Babe)

Did you make this recipe?

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MORE ST. PATRICKS DAY RECIPES TO TRY:

by Carrie Sellman

I know its still September but Im already getting in the mood for every things creepy and crawly and scary of Halloween. Own you checked out the new book, Candy Aisle Crafts by previous editor of Martha Stewart Living, Jodi Levine?

Im just drooling over every the amazing food craft projects. I dont remember the final time a book has been more inspiring to me. Jodi graciously offered to share one of my favorite projects from the book here today, these monster smores! Arent they amazing? Hold reading to see how to make them with your kids (or for yourself!)

Photography by Amy Gropp Forbes. Project by Jodi Levine 

Supplies
• parchment paper
• assorted flat cookies (such as honey or chocolate graham crackers, Nabisco Renowned Chocolate Wafers, and tea biscuits)
• thin flat chocolate bars (such as Hershey’s)
• scissors
• regular and mini marshmallows
• toothpick
• regular and mini chocolate chips

Instructions
1.

Preheat the broiler.
2. Line a baking sheet with parchment paper. Arrange the cookies on the baking sheet and put a piece of the chocolate bar on top of each one.
3. To make the eyes, cut mini or regular marshmallows in half horizontally. Arrange the halves on top of the chocolate, sticky side below. Poke holes in the marshmallows with the toothpick, and dig around to magnify the holes. Shove a mini or regular chocolate chip into each hole, pointy side down.
4. To make the teeth, cut angled pieces off the remaining mini or regular marshmallows and press the cut sides into the chocolate.
5. Put the baking sheet in the oven and watch carefully.

Remove as soon as the s’mores turn golden, about 45 seconds. They turn golden extremely quickly, in as quick as 45 seconds, and can burn before you know it, so stay correct next to the oven with your oven mitt on! Let them cool until they’re just warm before handling or eating.

Thanks for sharing a craft from your beautiful book, Jodi. You can purchase it correct here for $


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