Diy tree stump ideas

  1. Trees that grow shut together, especially if they are of the same species, develop a network of roots that sometimes share vascular tissue through a process known as root grafting. If trees own developed root grafting, herbicides applied to the stump of one tree will pass to the other trees.
  2. You may need to take other precautions if sprouts still develop after you grind the stump below, as some hardy trees can still sprout growth from the remaining stump.
  3. Even if tree roots are not grafted, they may release some of the herbicide into the soil through their root network.

    Once the herbicides are released into the environment, every surrounding plant life may absorb it.

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The Mercedes CLA is in numerous ways a mashup of automotive ideas while still managing to be its own thing, as well as a proper Mercedes-Benz.

For starters, the CLA-Class is distinguished from the C-Class by the former's front-wheel-drive architecture.

The CLA itself is also a four-door "coupé" fastback, not a traditional sedan. 

Once you figure that out, you can then settle into the M-B aspects of the CLA, mainly its amazing interior and sterling performance. It might be an entry-grade ride, but it never reminds you that you're at the beginning of a journey into German luxury cardom.

Mercedes loaned me a CLA for a week, and I drove it every over the vicinity of our suburban New Jersey test middle. Here's how it went:

When I moved into my home five years ago, the thick stands of maturetreeson the property was a huge selling point.

Of course, trees come below.

Be it from age, disease or natural disasters (we’re no strangers to hurricanes or tornadoes around these parts), several stumps resided in prominent places around the yard.

Not a problem, I thought. I’ll get correct on those.

Five years later, the stumps remained. One has been re-purposed as the base for a bird bath. Another serves as an anchor for a bluebird feeder. Another large and poorly positioned stump reminded me that where a mighty oak once stood was now an occasional makeshift table when working in the yard.

Its time had come.

It turns out stump removal services do not come cheap.

And renting a stump grinder to do the occupation would only make economic sense if I were taking out several stumps at the same time.

Our solution for removal may lack the convenience of hiring a service and misses the mark of speedy removal that comes with grinding.

Diy tree stump ideas

But a couple of months, thirty bucks and a bag of marshmallows later, that stump is gone and our landscaping fund remains intact.

Here’s how to remove a pesky stump when money actually is an object. Bear in mind, this involves burning, so check your local laws regarding open fires.


Community Q&A

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  1. Question

    I cut a tree below, leaving the stump, not realizing it could sprout again. Can I still follow the method of drilling holes and filling them with herbicides?

    Yes. Just make certain to cut every the sprouts first.

    My favorite way to kill stumps is to cover them with soil and mulch, and plant flowers and grasses to hide the mound.

    Dan Sharp VII

    Community Answer

  2. Question

    Why would anyone desire to kill a tree?

    It may be a hazard to your home, or the roots are busting a water and/or sewer line.

  3. Question

    Can weed and grass killer kill tree stumps?

    No. Weed and grass killer is not strong enough. You would just be destroying the area around the stump, rather than the stump itself.

    Dylan Dang

    Community Answer

  4. Question

    How can I kill a tree stump that is shut to a lake on my property?

    The safest way to to do this would be to periodically cut back any growth on the stump.

    You wouldn’t desire to use kerosene so shut to a lake.

    Andrew Carberry, MPH
    Food Systems Expert

    Andrew is a Senior Program Associate at Winrock International, where he works on the Community Based Food Systems Wallace Middle Team. Andrew Carberry has been working with school gardens and farm to school programs since He has a Masters in Public Health Nutrition and Public Health Planning and istration from the University of Tennessee-Knoxville.

  5. Question

    What could cause it to be impossible to divide an ancient stump with an ax or burn it?

    Some trees, especially the hardwoods, become almost love rock after they die and thoroughly dry out. I own seen axes and chainsaws bounce and slide off them. The harder and larger the stump, the larger and hotter the fire would own to be to make the stump burn. If you are capable to drill holes in the stump, you can attempt liquid solutions that cause the stump to rot. Otherwise, contact a professional stump grinding service.

    They can be expensive, but they are effective.

  6. Question

    Can I kill a stump using herbicide?

    Herbicide would own to be applied just after the tree is cut below, before the wounds shut up. Carefully paint herbicide on the stump, focusing on the outer rings/cambium layer.

    Andrew Carberry, MPH
    Food Systems Expert

    Andrew is a Senior Program Associate at Winrock International, where he works on the Community Based Food Systems Wallace Middle Team.

    Andrew Carberry has been working with school gardens and farm to school programs since He has a Masters in Public Health Nutrition and Public Health Planning and istration from the University of Tennessee-Knoxville.

    Diy tree stump ideas

  7. Question

    Do I remove the burlap bag before I plant it?

    Yes, remove the burlap. The bag is used to hold the roots in put so that they don’t separate from the tree. Once the tree is in the put you desire it, remove the burlap bag so the roots can grow out into the yard.

  8. Question

    How endless will it take to kill a stump using roundup?

    It won’t shoot again if you apply poison straight away after cutting the tree below when the sap is still flowing. It should be completely dead in weeks.

  9. Question

    Can I use Epsom salts as a weedkiller on paths and driveways?

    Use a recipe of Epsom salts, vinegar and soap to kill weeds and it worked just as excellent as roundup.

  10. Question

    Whats the quickest way to remove a Japanese maple stump with large roots?

    You can contact a professional and own them take care of it for you.

Show more answers

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Materials:

* Tree stump

* Sandpaper (medium and fine grit)

* Polyurethane (high gloss, semi-gloss, satin … whichever you want) I used satin which has just a nice sheen

* Paint brush

* 1 package of 4 Capita legs from Ikea (I used 6”) $

Drill and appropriate bits

Since I already own a tree stump table, (the one I made when I redid my house) for this post I had to make another.

Diy tree stump ideas

So when I went to order my fireplace wood I told the ancient guy who runs the trade I needed a stump to make a table out of. He dragged me to the back of the woodpile and pointed to a huge walnut log. He said that’s your table.

He got out his chainsaw and eyeballed a perfectly level cut. The stump table had begun.

He threw it in my trunk and I took it home.

I don’t care how you get your stump … just get one.

That is step number 1. Get a stump.

Your legs will be 6 inches high, so figure out how tall your stump needs to be for where you desire to put it.

My stump is 15″ across by 18″ high to bring it to the just under the arm of my couch.

Allow your stump to dry out for at least a month.

It’ll lose several pounds and the bark will loosen, making step 2 easier!

Coincidentally if you permit yourself to dry out for a month you’ll lose several pounds too.

You can dry the stump exterior for a couple of months, then bring it inside for a couple of weeks.

If your stump was already cut and dried from wherever you got it, you can just bring it inside for a couple of weeks.

Now the work begins. You own to remove the bark.

Sometimes this is simple, sometimes it isn’t.

The first stump table I made was from Oak. The bark just pulled off with my hands.

The second stump table I made was from Walnut. The bark was a nightmare to remove. I needed an array of tools, a swear jar and my boyfriend.

To remove the stump’s bark, you’ll need these tools to do it:

A Hammer

A Prybar

After your stump has dried inside for a couple of weeks insert the prybar between the bark and the stump.

Hammer it enough to loosen the wood.

Then either hold hammering or tug the bark loose with your fingers.

Keep doing this every the way around the stump until every the bark is off.

And yes, you do need to remove the bark.

If you don’t, over time it’ll loosen and drop off on it’s own leaving you with a cruddy looking piece of crud as a table.

If the bark is particularly stubborn, love this stupid thing was … do the same thing but with wood chisels.

They’re sharper and will cut through the fibres between the bark and the stump better than a prybar.

Be careful not to hack into the wood with the chisel though.

Now your stump is cleaned of its bark.

When it’s dried out the stump might divide a bit love this.

That’s O.K.

It adds character.

The stump now needs to be sanded to get every the little hairs and slivers off it.

You need a smooth stump.

Use a variety of sandpaper grits.

Get rid of every the hairs.

Sand until you can run your hand over the stump and it feels smooth.

Once your stump is smooth wipe over it with a damp, lint free cloth or a tack cloth.

A lot of wood dust will come off.

Now flip your stump over and get ready for the enjoyment part.

Get your pre-purchased legs.

Mine are the Capital legs from Ikea.

Each leg comes with a bracket that you screw into the base of your table.

Place your legs on the underside of your stump.

You can use every 4 legs or just 3.

I’m partial to 3, but 4 is definitely more stable.

Use a measuring tape to make certain they’re an equal distance apart.

Once you own the legs positioned, mark the holes in the plates with either a pencil or a marker.

Remove the legs and fit your drill with the appropriate sized drill bit.

Drill holes at the spots you marked for the screws.

Once every your holes are predrilled, put your legs and brackets back on and screw them into place.

To make my life easier, I put every my screws into a little dish.

Don’t question it. Just do it.

Now every your legs are on!

Now it’s time to finish the table.

If there are any sections where you accidentally took too much of the wood off you can skim over it with some stain.

I own a whack of diverse cans of stain so I picked the one I thought would match the best.

Appropriately, it was “Walnut” stain.

Just wipe it onto the light portion of your wood with some paper towel.

It just darkens it up enough to make it mix in a little better.

There will still be a colour variation, just not fairly as distinct.

The staining is a matter of choice.

On my first stump table I didn’t do it … on this one I did.

Let your stain soak in and dry.

Then get some of this …

… and one of these.

If you’re using an oil based finish use a natural bristle brush.

Seal the whole stump.

Sides … (that’s a quick moving cat in the background by the way)

… and top

The top of the stump will get really dark, but it’ll lighten up once the finish sinks in and dries.

After your first jacket dries gently sand off any burrs and bumps.

Remember … just sand lightly.

The sanding will leave the finish with a white haze.

Don’t worry about it.

It’ll go away once you apply another jacket of finish.

Speaking of which … your stump will need another 2 or 3 coats around the sides.

Plus it’ll need a entire of around 6 coats on the top. Because of the open grain, the finish soaks into the top a lot more and requires more coats.

Always let your finish dry the recommended quantity of time in between coats.

Once you’ve completed every coats of finish you can admire a thing of beauty.

The only drawback to this table?

Not a single dried earthworm on it. Plus, everyone who sees it is going to enquire you to make them one.

Diy tree stump ideas

Now, thanks to me, you can just direct them to this website and tell them to make their own.

This one by the way … went to my niece for Christmas. Yes, the niece who famously chucks things. She’s the chucker. This finished stump table weighs shut to 70 pounds. So excellent luck chuckin’ that little niece.

Now if you’ll excuse me, I own some decorating magazines to peruse.

Steps

2

Shielding it from the Sun

  • 2

    Wait three to six months. During this time, the stump will slowly die. Check it from time to time to see how things are progressing. It should start to rot and drop apart.

    1. As it dies and rots, you can use stump removal solution to speed the process along. It’s available at nurseries and garden centers.
    2. 1

      Cover the stump. This method is free, but can take a endless time. The thought is to slowly kill the stump by denying its basic needs. Put a dark tarp or trash bag over the stump so it won’t get sun or water.

    3. 3

      Cut off any saplings that crop up. Covering the stump should prevent anything from growing, but until the stump is dead, you can cut saplings off the base of the trunk as they sprout, or paint them with a woody brush killer that contains triclopyr.

      If your goal is to permit one tree to grow from the ancient stump, cut off additional saplings do not apply an herbicide.

    4. You can also add some Epsom salt to cracks that appear in the stump, or see Method One and drill holes in the stump and fill them with salt to make it go faster.
    5. 3

      Cut off any saplings that crop up. Covering the stump should prevent anything from growing, but until the stump is dead, you can cut saplings off the base of the trunk as they sprout, or paint them with a woody brush killer that contains triclopyr.

      If your goal is to permit one tree to grow from the ancient stump, cut off additional saplings do not apply an herbicide.

1

Using Epsom or Rock Salt

1

Using Epsom or Rock Salt

  • If you’re working with a stump that has large arial roots, drill holes in those as well.
  • For a stubborn stump you can attempt a chemical stump remover or an herbicide containing glyphosate or triclopyr instead of salt.[1] While a chemical herbicide will kill the stump faster, hold in mind that it could kill the roots of surrounding trees or shrubs as well.
  • 4

    Cover the stump. Put a plastic tarp, trash bag or another nonporous item over the stump to cover it.

    It will die more quickly without sunlight and rain to continue nourishing any shoots that come up. After six weeks to several months the stump will die. Check it every once in a while to see how things are progressing. When the stump is dead, it should start falling apart on its own.

  • 1

    Obtain Epsom salt or rock salt. Using Epsom salt or rock salt is an simple way to kill a stump cheaply. When you use the salt method it takes several months for the stump to die, so it might not be your best bet if you need to get rid of the stump quickly.

    1. Do not use regular table salt, which is harmful to the soil surrounding the stump. Use percent Epsom or rock salt with no added ingredients, to make certain the land around the stump doesn’t get disturbed.
    2. 1

      Drill holes in the stump. Burning is a excellent way to remove the stump after you own killed it. Start by drilling plenty of holes across the surface of the stump.

      Diy tree stump ideas

      The holes should be about 12 to 1 inch ( to  cm) wide and at least 8 inches ( cm) deep, or 12 inches ( cm) if you own a endless enough drill bit. Penetrating deeply will ensure the stump gets burned below to the tips of the roots so that it will be simple to remove.[3]

    3. 2

      Drill holes in the stump. Drill a pattern of holes across the surface of the stump, so the solution will be capable to penetrate. The holes should be about 12 to 1 inch ( to  cm) wide and at least 8 inches ( cm) deep, or 12 inches ( cm) if you own a endless enough drill bit. Penetrating deeply will ensure the salt solution saturates the roots under the trunk.[2]

      1. If you don’t own a drill bit this endless, use an ax to cut into the wood and make gouges as deep as you can.
      2. 3

        Pack the holes with salt and top them off with wax. Fill up the holes 3/4 full with epsom salt or rock salt.

        Don’t forget the holes you drilled in the arial roots. Now light a plain, unscented candle and drop wax into the holes to plug them.

        1. It’s significant to make certain the salt stays in put, rather than scattering over your yard, since excess salt can be harmful to topsoil and the roots of other plants.
        2. 4

          Cover the stump. Put a plastic tarp, trash bag or another nonporous item over the stump to cover it. It will die more quickly without sunlight and rain to continue nourishing any shoots that come up.

          After six weeks to several months the stump will die. Check it every once in a while to see how things are progressing. When the stump is dead, it should start falling apart on its own.

3

Burning the Stump

3

Burning the Stump

  • Check local city ordinances to make certain it’s legal to do a controlled burn. Call to discover out more information.
  • 2

    Pour kerosene into the holes. Soaking the stump with kerosene will enable you to light it on fire so it will burn into ash. Make certain the stump is fully saturated, or the fire may go out before it reaches the tips of the roots.

    1. Another option is to put charcoal on top of the stump and light the charcoal on fire.

      The coals will slowly burn below through the stump. This method will reduce the chances of burning nearby plants.

    2. Depending on the size of the stump, the burn may take several hours.
    3. 1

      Drill holes in the stump. Burning is a excellent way to remove the stump after you own killed it. Start by drilling plenty of holes across the surface of the stump. The holes should be about 12 to 1 inch ( to  cm) wide and at least 8 inches ( cm) deep, or 12 inches ( cm) if you own a endless enough drill bit.

      Penetrating deeply will ensure the stump gets burned below to the tips of the roots so that it will be simple to remove.[3]

    4. 4

      Dig out the ashes and fill in the hole. Use a shovel to remove every of the ashes, below through where the roots were, and fill in the hole with unused soil.

    5. If you’re worried about nearby objects catching fire, you shouldn’t use this method. You’re going to be setting the stump on fire, and while it’s fairly effective, it can be dangerous if you don’t own plenty of room around the stump.
    6. 3

      Build a fire on top of the stump. Put scrap wood on top of the stump and use a fire starter to ignite it.

      As the fire burns below, the stump will catch and burn up. Glance closely to make certain the stump actually catches, and add more wood as necessary to hold the fire going.[4]

      1. Be certain to monitor the stump as it burns to ash. Don’t leave it unattended, in case the fire gets out of hand.
      2. 4

        Dig out the ashes and fill in the hole. Use a shovel to remove every of the ashes, below through where the roots were, and fill in the hole with unused soil.

4

Chopping it Up

4

Chopping it Up

  • 2

    Cut the stump shut to the ground. Use a chainsaw to level off the stump just a few inches from the ground. Remove any branches or roots that stick up too far off the ground so that the stump grinder will own a stable surface on which to operate.[6]

  • If you don’t enjoy handling heavy machinery, call a local landscaper and explain that you own a stump that needs to be removed. You’ll be capable to pay someone else to do it.
  • 3

    Grind up the stump. Put on your goggles and mask, and position the stump grinder over the stump.

    Then, following the manufacturer’s instruction, move the grinder slowly across the stump’s surface to grind it up to bits. Continue along the arial roots to grind those as well until the stump has been fully ground up.

    1. Be careful not to get your feet in the way of the grinder. Wear heavy boots so you won’t accidentally hurt yourself.
    2. 1

      Get a stump grinder. You can also cut up a stump to remove it. To use this removal method, you will need a stump grinder. You can rent one from a home improvement store. This machine has a rotary cutter that will drill into and grind up the stump.

      It’s a excellent method to use if you own a huge, stubborn stump you need to remove. Renting a stump grinder is probably the most prudent option, but if you own a lot of stumps to grind, it might be worth it to purchase one.[5]

      1. Get protective equipment, too. Goggles and a mask will protect you from sawdust and flying wood chips.
      2. Make certain children and pets are safely away from the equipment before you start operating it.
      3. 2

        Cut the stump shut to the ground. Use a chainsaw to level off the stump just a few inches from the ground.

        Remove any branches or roots that stick up too far off the ground so that the stump grinder will own a stable surface on which to operate.[6]

      4. 4

        Shovel out the grindings and fill in the hole. Remove every of the wood chips and discard them (or use them as mulch, then fill in the hole with soil.

        1. You might need to use an ax to cut out remaining roots.


Tips

  1. You can purchase stains and dyes to stir into herbicides before you apply them. Dyes or stains visibly indicate where you treated the stump, so you do not miss spots or over-treat the wood, thereby increasing the risk of exposure to other trees.


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